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Research Papers

Experimental Study of the Incidence of Changing a Synthetic Jet Orifice in Heat Transfer Using a Taguchi Method Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Juan Sebastian Cano

Department of Mechanical and
Mechatronics Engineering,
Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE,
Sangolqui, 170124, Ecuador
e-mail: jscano@espe.edu.ec

Gustavo David Cordova

Department of Mechanical and
Mechatronics Engineering,
Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE,
Sangolqui, 170124, Ecuador
gcordova@espe.edu.ec

Christian Narvaez, Luis Segura, Luis Carrion

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE,
Sangolqui, 170124, Ecuador

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received June 6, 2018; final manuscript received December 13, 2018; published online February 6, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Cheng-Xian Lin.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 11(3), 031011 (Feb 06, 2019) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-18-1299; doi: 10.1115/1.4042351 History: Received June 06, 2018; Revised December 13, 2018

The current study allows the recognition of the most optimal combination of excitation frequency, kind of orifice, and synthetic jet-to-surface spacing in order to obtain the fastest cooling time using a Taguchi experimental design. To this end, the heat transfer and synthetic jet velocity behavior using different kinds of orifices are obtained experimentally. A piezoelectric diaphragm has been selected as a vibrating actuator. Four kinds of orifices have been studied: circular, rectangular, triangular, and square. First, the study consists of recognizing the excitation frequency in which each orifice produces the highest flow velocity. A hotwire anemometer has been used in order to measure the synthetic jet velocity. Additionally, a steel plate has been heated and then cooled using the synthetic jet set at the excitation frequency in which the jet velocity was the largest for each orifice. For the statistical analysis, the input study variables are the type of orifice and jet-to-surface spacing. The output variable has been the cooling time. The results show that using a combination of a rectangle orifice, 20 mm of jet-to-surface spacing and an excitation frequency of 2000 Hz, it is obtained the fastest cooling time. In addition, using these parameters, a mean heat transfer coefficient of 11.05 (W/m2K) with a coefficient of performance (COP) of 49.21 has been obtained. Finally, for each kind of orifice, there is the presence of two resonant frequencies, the Helmholtz (acoustic resonance) frequency and piezoelectric diaphragm natural frequency.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the synthetic jet actuator and orifice: (a) circle, (b) rectangle, (c) triangle, and (d) square

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Fig. 2

Experimental setup

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Fig. 3

Schematic of the experimental setup for flow velocity measurements: (1) data acquisition (bluetooth), (2) hotwire anemometer, (3) synthetic jet actuator, and (4) wave generator (sinusoidal wave of 7.25 Vrms)

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Fig. 4

Schematic of the experimental setup for foil surface temperature measurements

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Fig. 5

Temperature sensors location on the foil

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Fig. 6

Taguchi method stepwise procedure

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Fig. 7

Behavior of the flow velocity with respect to the frequency for the circular orifice

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Fig. 8

Behavior of the flow velocity with respect to the frequency for the rectangular orifice

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Fig. 9

Behavior of the flow velocity with respect to the frequency for the triangular orifice

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Fig. 10

Behavior of the flow velocity with respect to the frequency for the square orifice

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Fig. 11

Comparison between kinds of orifices at the jet-to-orifice axial distance of 5 mm

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the flow velocity between a previous study using a circular orifice

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Fig. 13

Response of the main effect factors in the cooling time

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Fig. 14

Interaction of the cooling time with the distance as well as the distance

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Fig. 15

Mean heat transfer coefficient versus jet-to surface axial distance for each of orifice. Excitation frequency (circle = 2200 Hz, rectangle = 2000 Hz, triangle = 2400 Hz, and square = 1700 Hz).

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Fig. 16

Coefficient of performance versus jet-to surface axial distance for each of orifice. Excitation frequency (circle = 2200 Hz, rectangle = 2000 Hz, triangle = 2400 Hz, square = 1700 Hz).

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Fig. 17

Cooling through time (jet velocity for each orifice, 1 m/s at jet-to-surface distance of 10 mm)

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Fig. 18

Comparison of the mean heat transfer coefficient between previous studies

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