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Research Papers

Large Eddy Simulation Study of Flow Dynamics in a Multiswirler Model Combustor at Elevated Pressure and High Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
Weijie Liu

Aero Engine Academy of China,
No. 21 ShunXing Road,
Beijing 101304, China
e-mail: liuwj2012@163.com

Qian Yang

Aero Engine Academy of China,
No. 21 ShunXing Road,
Beijing 101304, China
e-mail: yq11ys@163.com

Ranran Xue

Aero Engine Academy of China,
No. 21 ShunXing Road,
Beijing 101304, China
e-mail: 251978785@qq.com

Huiru Wang

Aero Engine Academy of China,
No. 21 ShunXing Road,
Beijing 101304, China
e-mail: jasoncombustion@126.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Thermal Science and Engineering Applications. Manuscript received December 25, 2018; final manuscript received April 20, 2019; published online May 22, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Matthew Oehlschlaeger.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 11(6), 061019 (May 22, 2019) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-18-1690; doi: 10.1115/1.4043624 History: Received December 25, 2018; Accepted April 22, 2019

Large eddy simulation (LES) of nonreacting turbulent flow in a multiswirler model combustor is carried out at elevated pressure and high temperature. Flow interaction between the main stage and the pilot stage is discussed based on the time-averaged and instantaneous flowfield. Flow dynamics in the multiswirling flow are analyzed using a phase-averaged method. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to extract dominant flow features in the multiswirling flow. Numerical results show that the main stage and the pilot stage flows interact with each other generating a complex flowfield. Flow interaction can be divided into three regions: converging region, merging region, and combined region. A precessing vortex core (PVC) is successfully captured in the pilot stage. PVC rotates with a first dominant frequency of 2756 Hz inducing asymmetric azimuthal flow instabilities in the pilot stage. POD analyses for the velocity fields also show dominant high-frequency modes (mode 1 and mode 2) in the pilot stage. However, the dominant energetic flow is damped rapidly downstream of the pilot stage such that it has a little effect on the main stage flow.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the structure of the multiswirler model combustor (mm)

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Fig. 2

Computational domain and boundary conditions of the multiswirler model combustor

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Fig. 3

Locations of numerical probes

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Fig. 4

Energy spectrum of axial velocity fluctuations at Pc-4

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Fig. 5

Distributions of time-averaged axial velocity (upper half) and z-vorticity (lower half) in the z = 0 plane

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Fig. 6

Schematic diagram of the flow interaction between main stage and pilot stage swirling flows. Only half flow is shown for clearness.

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Fig. 7

Temporal evolution of axial velocities at different radial locations of the primary pilot swirler exit (Ppp-1 to Ppp-4)

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Fig. 8

FFT spectra of pressure fluctuations at (a) the pilot stage flow and (b) the main stage flow

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Fig. 9

Temporal evolution of axial velocity and pressure fluctuation at Ppp-4

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Fig. 10

Phase-averaged axial velocity distributions at the primary pilot swirler exit for six different phases in one flow instability cycle

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Fig. 11

Phase-averaged axial velocity distributions at the pilot stage exit for six different phases in one flow instability cycle

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Fig. 12

PVC visualized by a constant low pressure isosurface (−35 kPa) and colored by the axial velocity

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Fig. 13

Energy captured by POD modes in the z = 0 plane with different numbers of LES snapshots

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Fig. 14

(a) and (b) First two POD modes of the flowfield at the primary pilot swirler exit, (c) power spectra of temporal coefficients ai(t), and (d) energy captured by each mode. The vectors represent the velocity field, and the gray background indicate the strength of the vorticity.

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Fig. 15

(a) and (b) First two POD modes of the flowfield at the pilot stage exit, (c) power spectra of temporal coefficients, and (d) energy captured by each mode

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Fig. 16

(a) and (b) First two POD modes obtained from flowfield in the z = 0 plane and (c) power spectra of temporal coefficients

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