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Research Papers

Heat Transfer Analysis of Flash Evaporation With MEPCM

[+] Author and Article Information
Yang Guo

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science,
College of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: dmuguoyang@126.com

Hongbin Ma

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: mah@missouri.edu

Benwei Fu

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science,
College of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: 845744877@qq.com

Yulong Ji

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science,
College of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: jiyulongcn@163.com

Fengmin Su

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science,
College of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: fengminsu@dlmu.edu.cn

Corey Wilson

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science,
College of Marine Engineering,
Dalian Maritime University,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: corey.wilson@thermavant.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Thermal Science and Engineering Applications. Manuscript received June 8, 2018; final manuscript received March 1, 2019; published online May 13, 2019. Assoc. Editor: T.S. Ravigururajan.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 11(5), 051016 (May 13, 2019) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-18-1302; doi: 10.1115/1.4043089 History: Received June 08, 2018; Accepted March 04, 2019

Several seawater desalination technologies have been developed and widely used during the last four decades. In the current investigation, a new approach to the seawater desalination process is presented, which utilizes microencapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs) and thin film evaporation. In this process, the MEPCMs were placed into hot seawater. Then, the hot seawater and the MEPCMs containing the liquid phase change material (PCM) were ejected into a vacuum flash chamber. A thin liquid film of seawater was formed on the surface of the MEPCM, which subsequently vaporized. This evaporation significantly increased the evaporation heat transfer and enhanced the desalination efficiency. Film evaporation on MEPCM surfaces decreased their temperature by absorbing sensible heat. If their temperature was lower than the phase change temperature, the MEPCM would change phase from liquid to solid releasing the latent heat, resulting in further evaporation. The MEPCMs were then pumped back into the hot seawater, and the salt residue left on the MEPCMs could be readily dissolved. In this way, the desalination efficiency could be increased and corrosion reduced. A mathematical model was developed to determine the effects of MEPCM and thin film evaporation on desalination efficiency. An analytical solution using Lighthill's approach was obtained. Results showed that when MEPCMs with a radius of 100 µm and a water film of 50 µm were used, the evaporation rate and evaporative capacity were significantly increased.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The structure and heat flow of the MEPCM

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Fig. 2

Physical model of MEPCM

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Fig. 3

The perturbation results compared with simulation results and experimental results of a droplet with a diameter of 7.5 mm

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Fig. 4

The perturbation results compared with simulation results and experimental results of a droplet with a diameter of 10.5 mm

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Fig. 5

The perturbation results compared with simulation results and experimental results of a droplet with a diameter of 12.5 mm

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Fig. 6

The location of the interface moved inward

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Fig. 7

Comparison of temperature with and without MEPCM

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Fig. 8

Comparison of heat flow with and without MEPCM

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Fig. 9

Comparison of evaporation rate with and without MEPCM

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Fig. 10

Comparison of water productivity with and without MEPCM

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Fig. 11

Comparison of temperature with different thicknesses of water film

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Fig. 12

Water productivity with different water film thicknesses

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Fig. 13

Comparison of temperature with different sizes of MEPCM

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Fig. 14

Water productivity with different sizes of MEPCM

Tables

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