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Research Papers

Numerical and Experimental Study of the Effect of Secondary Surfaces Fixed Over a Rectangular Vortex Generator

[+] Author and Article Information
Uddip Kashyap, Biplab Kumar Debnath

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Institute of Technology Meghalaya,
Meghalaya 793003, India

Koushik Das

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
National Institute of Technology Meghalaya,
Meghalaya 793003, India
e-mail: koushik.das@nitm.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Thermal Science and Engineering Applications. Manuscript received October 26, 2018; final manuscript received February 19, 2019; published online May 3, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Amir Jokar.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 11(6), 061003 (May 03, 2019) (12 pages) Paper No: TSEA-18-1541; doi: 10.1115/1.4043007 History: Received October 26, 2018; Accepted February 20, 2019

In order to cool a heated surface surrounded by fluid flow, vortex generator plays a significant role. The presence of a vortex generator in the flow creates both latitudinal and longitudinal vortices. The vortices energize the boundary layer over the heated surface and excel convective mode of heat transfer. Therefore, the strength of these vortices is directly proportional to the heat transferal rate. The present study considers a vortex generator attached to a heated base plate. The system is studied numerically and experimentally. The existing rectangular vortex generator is modified computationally with a goal to escalate the overall heat transferal rate. The role of secondary surfaces fixed over the primary surface of the rectangular vortex generator is discussed. Water flows over the surface of the base plate at a Reynolds number of 350. And the plate has a constant heat flux of 1 kW/m2. The results show that the secondary surfaces fixed parallel to the heated plate over the vortex generator significantly augment the heat transfer rate to about 13.4%. However, it enhances the drag by 5.7%. A linear regression analysis predicts the suitable placement of the secondary surface with an enhancement of heat transfer rate of about 7.6%, with a decrease in the drag by about 0.7%. In order to validate the obtained results, the best configuration is fabricated and tested experimentally. The experimental outcomes are found to complement the numerical results. In this experiment, the modification yields 25% enhancement in heat transfer rate.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Schematic diagram of the considered rectangular vortex generator fixed over a base plate and (b) 3D model of VG of cases A–H

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Fig. 2

(a, c) Schematic diagram of the experimental setup and the heated base plate with (b, d) photograph of the experimental setup

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Fig. 3

(a–h) and (i–p) are y-velocity contours of cases A–H at a vertical cross-sectional plane, x′ = 0.015 m and x′ = 0.060 m respectively

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Fig. 4

(a–h) Temperature contours of cases A–H at a vertical cross-sectional plane, x′ = 0.060 m

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Fig. 5

Variation of (a, b) f (c, d) , and (e, f) p along the flow over the base plate for cases A–H

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Fig. 6

Comparison of (a) N̿u̿ and (b) cd for cases A–H

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Fig. 7

Comparison of thermal performance factor (η) for cases A–H

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Fig. 8

Prediction of optimal height of the secondary surface from the base plate, C1 using linear regression model

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Fig. 9

Accuracy check of the thermocouples using the master sensor

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Fig. 10

(a) Re versus N̿u̿ for a flow over flat plate considering different turbulent model and existing experimental result and (b) numerical and experimental comparison of spatial averaged temperature over the heated base plate

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Fig. 11

Experimental and Numerical comparison of N̿u̿ for case I, case II, and case III at Re = 5000

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Fig. 12

(a,d) Schematic diagram of considered rectangular VG (case II) and rectangular VG with attached secondary surface (case III), (b,d) and (c,f) y-velocity and temperature contour of case II and case III, respectively, at x′ = 0.040 m, respectively

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