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Research Papers

Air Ventilation and Comfort in Railway Vehicles Operating in Ventilation Mode

[+] Author and Article Information
Alfredo Iranzo

Thermal Engineering Group,
Energy Engineering Department,
School of Engineering,
University of Seville,
Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n,
Seville 41092, Spain
e-mail: airanzo@us.es

José Antonio Salva

AICIA—Thermal Engineering Group,
School of Engineering,
Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n,
Seville 41092, Spain;
Kelvion Thermal Solutions,
S.A.U. B San Juan, 28,
Igorre 48140, Vizcaya, Spain
e-mail: jsalva@etsi.us.es

José Guerra

Thermal Engineering Group,
Energy Engineering Department,
School of Engineering,
University of Seville,
Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n,
Seville 41092, Spain
e-mail: jjguerra@us.es

Gonzalo Barea

Internacional Hispacold S.A.,
C/Pino Alepo 1, Polígono Industrial El Pino,
Seville 41016, Spain
e-mail: gbarea@hispacold.es

Francisco Javier Pino

Thermal Engineering Group,
Energy Engineering Department,
School of Engineering,
University of Seville,
Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n,
Seville 41092, Spain
e-mail: fjp@us.es

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received October 11, 2018; final manuscript received December 3, 2018; published online January 29, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Sandip Mazumder.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 11(3), 031010 (Jan 29, 2019) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-18-1503; doi: 10.1115/1.4042218 History: Received October 11, 2018; Revised December 03, 2018

This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the air and temperature distribution in a representative railway vehicle, with the objective of evaluating passengers' thermal comfort. The CFD model developed is featuring the wagon geometry in detail including air diffusers geometry, passengers, and luminaires. A set of different scenarios are studied, covering occupancy levels, state of the doors and windows (open/closed), inlet temperature, and air diffuser design. The results show a clear influence of the air supply system and design geometry on comfort, as local velocities well above 1 m/s were obtained for the original design. A new diffuser design proposed clearly improved the velocity field distribution enhancing passengers' thermal comfort. Exhaust vents are also presenting high velocities, which are significantly reduced down to 2 m/s when windows are open. It is observed that thermal comfort is not appropriate when air inlet temperature is conditioned to 19 °C, especially for the original diffuser design.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Three-dimensional railway vehicle model view with main ventilation system elements (passengers' and driver cabins)

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Fig. 2

Three-dimensional railway vehicle model view with dummies occupancy: seated (blue in online version) and standing (orange in online version)

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Fig. 3

Railway meshing overview (top), cabin cross section (bottom-left), and air diffusers (bottom-right)

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Fig. 4

Horizontal (H) and vertical planes (Y1 longitudinal, X1, X2 cross section) for results postprocessing

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Fig. 5

Velocity fields, case 2. Driver's cabin on the right. Top: vertical longitudinal plane Y1. Bottom: horizontal plane at +1.1 m (refer to the online version for the full-color figure).

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Fig. 6

Velocity fields, case 2. Left: vertical cross section plane X1. Right: vertical cross section plane X2. Horizontal line marks +1.1 m level (refer to the online version for the full-color figure).

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Fig. 12

Velocity fields, case 16. Left: vertical cross section plane X1. Right: vertical cross section plane X2. Horizontal line marks +1.1 m level (refer to the online version for the full-color figure).

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Fig. 11

Velocity fields, case 16. Driver's cabin on the right. Top: vertical longitudinal plane Y1. Bottom: horizontal plane at +1.1 m (refer to the online version for the full-color figure).

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Fig. 10

Plant and 3D view of the new diffuser geometry (left) with respect to the original diffuser (right)

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Fig. 9

Temperature distribution in the vertical X1 and X2 planes (refer to the online version for the full-color figure)

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Fig. 8

Temperature distribution in the vertical Y1 plane (top). Velocity distribution in the vertical Y1 plane (middle) and horizontal H plane at +1.1 m (bottom) (refer to the online version for the full-color figure).

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Fig. 7

Superficial temperature at the dummies (case 8) (refer to the online version for the full-color figure)

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