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Research Papers

Novel Experimental Study of Fabric Drying Using Direct-Contact Ultrasonic Vibration

[+] Author and Article Information
Viral K. Patel

Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
Energy and Transportation Sciences Division,
Building Equipment Research Group,
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
e-mail: patelvk@ornl.gov

Frederick Kyle Reed

Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
Electrical and Electronics Systems Research
Division,
Sensors and Embedded Systems Group,
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
e-mail: reedfk@ornl.gov

Roger Kisner

Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
Electrical and Electronics Systems Research
Division,
Sensors and Embedded Systems Group,
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
e-mail: kisnerra@ornl.gov

Chang Peng

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611
e-mail: chang.peng@ufl.edu

Saeed Moghaddam

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611
e-mail: saeedmog@ufl.edu

Ayyoub Mehdizadeh Momen

Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
Energy and Transportation Sciences Division,
Building Equipment Research Group,
Oak Ridge, TN 37831
e-mail: momena@ornl.gov

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received June 12, 2018; final manuscript received September 24, 2018; published online November 5, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Pedro Mago. The United States Government retains, and by accepting the article for publication, the publisher acknowledges that the United States Government retains, a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for United States government purposes.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 11(2), 021008 (Nov 05, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-18-1308; doi: 10.1115/1.4041596 History: Received June 12, 2018; Revised September 24, 2018

Fabric drying is an energy-intensive process, which generally involves blowing hot dry air across tumbling wet fabric to facilitate evaporation and moisture removal. Most of the energy supplied is used to overcome the enthalpy of vaporization for water. Although this process tends to be inefficient, it is fairly simple and forms the basis for the majority of existing clothes dryer technology today. To address the relatively low efficiency, a new method of drying called “direct contact ultrasonic fabric drying” is proposed. The process involves using high-frequency vibration introduced by piezoelectric transducers, which are in contact with wet fabric. The vibration is used to extract water droplets from the fabric mechanically. In this study, a total of 24 individual transducers are used in a module to dry a 142 cm2 sized fabric. The performance characterization of this single module has enabled successful scale-up of the system to a midscale prototype dryer, which can be used to ultrasonically dry clothing-sized fabric (∼750 cm2). The first-generation ultrasonic fabric dryer fabricated uses as little as 17% of the energy needed by traditional evaporation-based drying techniques. In addition to experimental data, this paper presents the results of a kinetic and scaling analysis that provides some important insights into ultrasonic drying.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of selected mesh transducer

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Fig. 2

Top side of PCB module with 24 piezoelectric mesh transducers installed

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Fig. 3

Illustration of burst width modulation

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Fig. 4

Placement of fabric onto ultrasonic transducer module for drying

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Fig. 5

Energy per unit gram of moisture removal as a function of RMC for select experiments

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Fig. 6

Energy per unit gram of moisture removal as a function of RMC for select experiments (cont.)

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Fig. 7

Relative moisture content as a function of elapsed time for select experiments

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Fig. 8

Vibrational amplitude as a function of input voltage at resonant frequency for mesh-type transducer

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Fig. 9

Normalized moisture removal rate as a function of normalized acceleration

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Fig. 10

Illustration of a stationary droplet of liquid trapped within an idealized pore in the fabric

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Fig. 11

Initial and final water content in fabric pore before and after ultrasonic drying

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Fig. 12

Water remaining in pores relative to initial amount after ultrasonic drying, for a given acceleration and pore size

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Fig. 13

Midscale prototype ultrasonic clothes dryer—proof of concept

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