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Technical Brief

Comparison between experimental and Heart rate-derived core body temperatures using a 3D whole body model

[+] Author and Article Information
Rupak K. Banerjee

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221
Rupak.Banerjee@UC.Edu

Robins T. Kalathil

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221
kalathrt@mail.uc.edu

Swarup Zachariah

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221
swarup.zachariah@ansys.com

Anup Paul

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45221
anup.paul@stress.com

Amit Bhattacharya

Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, OH, 45267
amit.bhattacharya@uc.edu

Gavin Horn

University of Illinois Fire Service Institute, 11 Gerty Drive, Champaign, IL, 61820
ghorn@illinois.edu

Denise Smith

University of Illinois Fire Service Institute, 11 Gerty Drive, Champaign, IL, 61820; Health and Exercise Sciences Department, Skidmore College, 815 North Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY, 12866
dsmith@skidmore.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4041594 History: Received January 20, 2018; Revised September 17, 2018

Abstract

Determination of core body temperature (Tc), a measure of metabolic rate, in firefighters is needed to avoid heat-stress related injury in real time. Measurement of Tc is neither routine nor trivial. This research is significant as thermal model to determine Tc is still fraught with uncertainties and reliable experimental data for validation is rare. The objective of this study is to develop a human thermoregulatory model that uses the heart rate measurements to obtain the Tc for firefighters using a 3D whole body model. The hypothesis is that the heart rate-derived computed Tc correlates with the measured Tc during firefighting activities. The transient thermal response of the human body was calculated by simultaneously solving the Pennes' bioheat and energy balance equations. The difference between experimental and numerical values of the Tc was less than 2.6%. More importantly, a ±10% alteration in heart rate was observed to have appreciable influence on the Tc, resulting in a ±1.2 °C change. A 10% increase in the heart rate causes a significant relative % increase (52%) in Tc, considering its allowable/safe limit of 39.5 °C. Routine acquisition of the heart rate data during firefighting scenario can be used to derive Tc of firefighters in real time using the proposed 3D whole body model.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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