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research-article

Analysis of passive temperature control systems using PCM for application to secondary batteries cooling

[+] Author and Article Information
Roberto Bubbico

Department of Chemical, Materials and Environmental Engineering, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184, Rome, Italy
roberto.bubbico@uniroma1.it

Francesco D'Annibale

Laboratory for Development of Chemical and Thermal Fluid Dynamic Processes for Energy, ENEA, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123, Rome, Italy
francesco.dannibale@enea.it

Barbara Mazzarotta

Department of Chemical, Materials and Environmental Engineering, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184, Rome, Italy
barbara.mazzarotta@uniroma1.it

Carla Menale

Department of Chemical, Materials and Environmental Engineering, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184, Rome, Italy
carla.menale@uniroma1.it

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040643 History: Received January 22, 2018; Revised May 09, 2018

Abstract

Temperature control is one of the most significant factors to improve the performance and extend the cycle life of a battery. It is therefore important to design and implement an effective battery thermal management system. Phase Change Materials (PCM) can be used as a cooling means for batteries. In the present paper a preliminary analysis of the thermal behavior of PCMs used to cool down a heated metal surface, was carried out. Tests have shown that pure PCMs are able to limit the temperature increase, but only for relatively low heat fluxes. At higher values of the heat produced, the thermal conductivity of the PCM was increased by using solid foams characterized by higher thermal conductivity; it was thus possible to keep the surface temperature within safe limits for longer times. A CFD model of the composite material (PCM+solid foam), was also developed, which allowed to accurately predict the temperature trend within the system under different boundary conditions. However, the average thermal conductivity of the composite system which best fitted the experimental results was found to be much lower than predicted by using common semi-empirical correlations.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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