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Research Papers

Two-Dimensional Flow Passage Through a Hot Ribbed Channel: Effect of First Rib Width

[+] Author and Article Information
Boudjemaa Omari

Theoretical and Applied Laboratory of
Fluid Mechanics,
Faculty of Physics,
University of Science and Technology
Houari Boumediene—USTHB,
BP 32 El Alia,
Bab Ezzouar 16111, Algeria

Amina Mataoui

Theoretical and Applied Laboratory of
Fluid Mechanics,
Faculty of Physics,
University of Science and Technology
Houari Boumedienne—USTHB,
BP 32 El Alia,
Bab Ezzouar 16111, Algeria
e-mail: amataoui@usthb.dz

Abdelaziz Salem

Theoretical and Applied Laboratory of
Fluid Mechanics,
Faculty of Physics,
University of Science and Technology
Houari Boumedienne—USTHB,
BP 32 El Alia,
Bab Ezzouar 16111, Algeria

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received July 12, 2017; final manuscript received April 17, 2018; published online June 25, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Carey J. Simonson.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 10(5), 051021 (Jun 25, 2018) (15 pages) Paper No: TSEA-17-1255; doi: 10.1115/1.4040277 History: Received July 12, 2017; Revised April 17, 2018

This work investigates numerically by finite volume method using Low k–ω model, the forced turbulent convection through a channel roughened by seven heated ribs arranged transversely. These ribs of rectangular cross section have a blocking ratio H/h = 10 and pitch ratio λ/h = 3. The modeling the problem parameters are Reynolds number, ranging from 5480 to 68500, and the width of the first rib L1 ranging from 0.5h to 15h. The objective of this study is to look for the width of the first rib L1 which induces the best heat transfer. The flow configurations of identical ribs from the first one generate a large eddy spreading along the top of the two first ribs, blocking the flow of the first cavity. The widening of the first rib may solve this problem. This flow configuration is required in several engineering applications necessitating the flow periodicity starting from the first cavity. The streamlines show that the first rib acts as a forward facing step when L1 > 5h. The effect of the width of the first rib is highlighted by velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy and temperature profiles. Nusselt number distributions confirm that the widening of the heated surface is not recommended for improving heat transfer in spite of flow periodicity in all cavities (roughness d-type). The best improvement in heat transfer of 18%, compared to a smooth wall is obtained for thinnest first rib of L1/h = 0.5. However, this configuration provides a minor heat exchange at the first pitch and the second rib, which might be a disadvantage for the material structure.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Flow pattern: (a) two-dimensional (2D), and (b) three-dimensional, and (c) pitch parameters

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Fig. 2

Typical grid case (L1 = 3H) (a) computational domain, (b) and (c) area of the flow—ribs interaction

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Fig. 4

Streamlines contours (a) and isotherms (b) and (c) streamlines of first ribs region

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Fig. 5

Computed contours of kinetic energy (k/kmax)

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Fig. 6

Longitudinal velocity and pressure cross evolutions

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Fig. 7

Kinetic energy and temperature cross evolutions

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Fig. 8

Longitudinal velocity, kinetic energy, and temperature evolutions

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Fig. 9

Local Nusselt number along cavities bottom wall for several L1

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Fig. 10

Local Nusselt number along left side of first to fourth rib for several L1

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Fig. 11

Local Nusselt number along upper face of first to fourth rib for several L1

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Fig. 12

Local Nusselt number along right side of first to seventh rib for several L1

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Fig. 13

Averaged Nusselt number

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Fig. 14

Averaged Nusselt number (a) pitch averaged Nusselt number and (b) cavity averaged Nusselt number

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Fig. 15

Evolutions of the Nusselt number rate Nu¯Nus¯¯, friction factor (f/fs)1/3 and heat transfer enhancement parameter F=Nu¯Nus¯f/fs1/3

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