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research-article

FABRICATION OF A CELL CULTURE PLATE WITH A 3D PRINTED MOLD AND THERMAL ANALYSIS OF PDMS-BASED CASTING PROCESS

[+] Author and Article Information
Myo Min Zaw

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, 21250
myo1@umbc.edu

William D. Hedrich

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore
whedrich@umaryland.edu

Timothy Munuhe

ASME Member, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore
tim.munuhe@umbc.edu

Mohamad Hossein Banazadeh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore
mh.banazade@gmail.com

Hongbing Wang

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore
hwang@rx.umaryland.edu

Stephen Andrew Gadsden

ASME Member, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
gadsden@umbc.edu

Liang Zhu

ASME Member, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, 21250
zliang@umbc.edu

Ronghui Ma

ASME Member, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, 21250
roma@umbc.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040134 History: Received October 17, 2017; Revised April 04, 2018

Abstract

We fabricated a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cell culture plate using PDMS casting method with a mold printed by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) method and performed thermal analysis of the curing process to understand thermal damage to the mold at elevated temperatures. The cell co-culture plate is designed to study drug efficacy and toxicity simultaneously. Cell viability study indicates that the produced PDMS plate has the suitable biocompatibility, surface properties, and transparency for cell culture purposes. The mold printed from acrylonitrile-butadiene-syrene was reusable after curing at 65°C, but was damaged after being heated at 75°C, although both temperatures are far below the glass transition temperature of ABS. A heat transfer model was developed considering conduction, convection, and radiation in the oven to predict temperature distribution in the ABS mold during the curing process. The simulated temperature distribution was consistent with the observed mold deformation. As the maximum temperature difference in the mold did not change appreciably with the curing temperature, we speculate that temperature gradient is not the only cause of the observed thermal deformation. Air expansion in the porous structure at high temperatures may also be responsible for the damage. Therefore, in addition to low curing temperatures, reducing the porosity of the printed mold may help avoid thermal damage to the mold. With careful control of the curing process, the affordable and accessible fused deposition modeling method has great potential for fast prototyping of custom-designed cell culture devices for biomedical research.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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