0
Research Papers

Investigations on Convective Heat Transfer Enhancement in Circular Tube Radiator Using Al2O3 and CuO Nanofluids

[+] Author and Article Information
Sobin Alosious

Department of Applied Mechanics,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Chennai 600036, India

S. R. Sarath, K. Krishnakumar

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
College of Engineering, Trivandrum,
Thiruvananthapuram 695016, India

Anjan R. Nair

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
College of Engineering, Trivandrum,
Thiruvananthapuram 695016, India
e-mail: anjanrn@gmail.com

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received July 21, 2017; final manuscript received March 6, 2018; published online May 22, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Amir Jokar.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 10(5), 051012 (May 22, 2018) (11 pages) Paper No: TSEA-17-1264; doi: 10.1115/1.4039924 History: Received July 21, 2017; Revised March 06, 2018

In this study, forced convective heat transfer inside a circular tube automobile radiator is experimentally and numerically investigated. The investigation is carried out using Al2O3 and CuO nanofluids with water as their base fluid. A single radiator circular tube with the same dimensions is numerically modeled. Numerical model is validated using the experimental study results. In the experimental study, Al2O3 and CuO nanofluids of 0.05% volume concentrations (ϕ) were recirculated through the radiator for the Reynolds number (Re) between 260 and 1560. The numerical investigation is conducted for the nanoparticle volume concentration from 0% to 6.0% and 260 < Re < 1560. The investigation shows an enhancement of convective heat transfer coefficient (h) with the increase in nanoparticle volume concentration and with the Reynolds number. A maximum enhancement of 38% and 33% were found for Al2O3 and CuO nanofluids of ϕ = 1% and Re = 1560. For the same cooling load of the radiator, the pumping power can be reduced by 8% and 10%, when Al2O3 and CuO nanofluids (ϕ = 0.8%) were used. Enhancement in convective heat transfer can be utilized to reduce the radiator surface area required. However, the addition of nanofluid results in an enhancement of density (ρ) and viscosity (μ) along with a reduction in specific heat capacity (Cp). Hence, the selection of nanoparticle volume concentration should consider its effect on the thermophysical properties mentioned earlier. It is found that the preferred concentration is between 0.4% and 0.8% for both Al2O3 and CuO nanofluids. In our investigations, it is observed that the convective heat transfer performance of Al2O3 nanofluid is better than the CuO nanofluid.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Choi, S.-S. , and Eastman, J. , 1995, “ Enhancing Thermal Conductivity of Fluids With Nanoparticles,” Developments and Applications of Non-Newtonian Flows (International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Vol. 231), D. A. Siginer and D. A. Siginer, eds., American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, pp. 99–105.
Eastman, J. , Choi, U. , Li, S. , Thompson, L. , and Lee, S. , 1996, “ Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Through the Development of Nanofluids,” MRS Proc., 457, p. 3.
Zhu, H. T. , Lin, Y. S. , and Yin, Y. S. , 2004, “ A Novel One-Step Chemical Method for Preparation of Copper Nanofluids,” J. Colloid Interface Sci., 277(1), pp. 100–103. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Nguyen, C. , Desgranges, F. , Roy, G. , Galanis, N. , Mar, T. , Boucher, S. , and Mintsa, H. A. , 2007, “ Temperature and Particle-Size Dependent Viscosity Data for Water-Based Nanofluids Hysteresis Phenomenon,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 28(6), 1492–1506.
Chavan, D. , and Pise, A. T. , 2014, “ Performance Investigation of an Automotive Car Radiator Operated With Nanofluid as a Coolant,” ASME J. Therm. Sci. Eng. Appl., 6(2), p. 021010. [CrossRef]
Bozorgan, N. , Krishnakumar, K. , and Bozorgan, N. , 2012, “ Numerical Study on Application of Cuo-Water Nanofluid in Automotive Diesel Engine Radiator,” Mod. Mech. Eng., 2(4), pp. 130–136. [CrossRef]
Leong, K. , Saidur, R. , Kazi, S. , and Mamun, A. , 2010, “ Performance Investigation of an Automotive Car Radiator Operated With Nanofluid-Based Coolants (Nanofluid as a Coolant in a Radiator),” Appl. Therm. Eng., 30(17–18), pp. 2685–2692. [CrossRef]
Vajjha, R. S. , and Das, D. K. , 2009, “ Experimental Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Three Nanofluids and Development of New Correlations,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 52(21–22), pp. 4675–4682. [CrossRef]
Peyghambarzadeh, S. , Hashemabadi, S. , Hoseini, S. , and Jamnani, M. S. , 2011, “ Experimental Study of Heat Transfer Enhancement Using Water/Ethylene Glycol Based Nanofluids as a New Coolant for Car Radiators,” Int. Commun. Heat Mass Transfer, 38(9), pp. 1283–1290. [CrossRef]
Bianco, V. , Chiacchio, F. , Manca, O. , and Nardini, S. , 2009, “ Numerical Investigation of Nanofluids Forced Convection in Circular Tubes,” Appl. Therm. Eng., 29(17–18), pp. 3632–3642. [CrossRef]
Shen, J. , Liburdy, J. A. , Pence, D. V. , and Narayanan, V. , 2009, “ Droplet Impingement Dynamics: Effect of Surface Temperature During Boiling and Non-Boiling Conditions,” J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 21(46), p. 464133. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Prasad, P. D. , Gupta, A. , Sreeramulu, M. , Sundar, L. S. , Singh, M. , and Sousa, A. C. , 2015, “ Experimental Study of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor of Al2O3 Nanofluid in U-Tube Heat Exchanger With Helical Tape Inserts,” Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 62, pp. 141–150. [CrossRef]
Xuan, Y. , and Roetzel, W. , 2000, “ Conceptions for Heat Transfer Correlation of Nanofluids,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 43(19), pp. 3701–3707. [CrossRef]
Kakaç, S. , and Pramuanjaroenkij, A. , 2009, “ Review of Convective Heat Transfer Enhancement With Nanofluids,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 52(13–14), pp. 3187–3196. [CrossRef]
Ray, D. R. , Das, D. K. , and Vajjha, R. S. , 2014, “ Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Nanofluids Performance in a Compact Minichannel Plate Heat Exchanger,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 71, pp. 732–746. [CrossRef]
Maxwell, J. C. , 1873, A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 1st ed., Vol. 1, Clarendon Press, Oxford, UK.
Einstein, A. , 1956, Investigations on the Theory of the Brownian Movement, Courier Corporation, Dover publications, Mineola, NY.
Kline, S. J. , and McClintock, F. , 1953, “ Describing Uncertainties in Single-Sample Experiments,” Mech. Eng., 75(1), pp. 3–8. https://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/10006920514/
Maiga, S. E. B. , Palm, S. J. , Nguyen, C. T. , Roy, G. , and Galanis, N. , 2005, “ Heat Transfer Enhancement by Using Nanofluids in Forced Convection Flows,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 26(4), pp. 530–546. [CrossRef]
Heris, S. Z. , Esfahany, M. N. , and Etemad, S. G. , 2007, “ Experimental Investigation of Convective Heat Transfer of Al2O3/Water Nanofluid in Circular Tube,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 28(2), pp. 203–210. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Geometry and dimensions of circular tube

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Cross-sectional view of grid layout used in the present study

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Variation of convective heat transfer coefficient with respect to Reynolds number for CuO/H2O nanofluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Variation of Nusselt number with respect to Reynolds number for Al2O3/H2O nanofluid (0 < ϕ < 1.0%)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Comparison of experimental and numerical study results of CuO/H2O nanofluid with 0.05% particle volume concentration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison of numerical study results of Al2O3/H2O nanofluid with previous works

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Comparison of experimental and numerical study results of Al2O3/H2O nanofluid with 0.05% particle volume concentration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Variation of convective heat transfer coefficient with respect to Reynolds number for Al2O3/H2O nanofluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Variation of Nusselt number with respect to Reynolds numbers for CuO/H2O nanofluid (0 < ϕ < 1.0%)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Variation of Nusselt number with respect to Reynolds numbers for Al2O3/H2O nanofluid (0 < ϕ < 6.0%)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Variation of Nusselt number with respect to Reynolds numbers for CuO/H2O nanofluid (0 < ϕ < 6.0%)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Variation of Al2O3/H2O nanofluid temperature at the outlet cross section of the tube for six different Reynolds numbers, ϕ = 1.0%

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Variation of average wall shear stress with respect to nanoparticle volume concentration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Variation of Chilton–Colburn factor with respect tonanoparticle volume concentrations for the Reynolds number = 1560

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Variation of hratio × Cp,ratio factor with respect to nanoparticle volume concentration for the Reynolds number = 1560

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Variation of influence factor with respect to Reynolds number

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Variation of convective heat transfer coefficient along the length of the tube for the Reynolds number = 1560

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Variation of wall shear stress along the length of the tube for the Reynolds number = 1560

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Variation of pumping power ratio and area ratio for Al2O3/H2O nanofluid for the Reynolds number = 1560

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

Variation of pumping power ratio and area ratio for CuO/H2O nanofluid for the Reynolds number = 1560

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In