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research-article

CONTROL OF SPRAY EVAPORATIVE COOLING IN AUTOMOTIVE IC ENGINES

[+] Author and Article Information
Soheil Jafari

Department of Engineering and Design, School of Engineering and Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QT, UK
s.jafari@cranfield.ac.uk

Julian Dunne

Department of Engineering and Design, School of Engineering and Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QT, UK
j.f.dunne@sussex.ac.uk

Mostafa Langari

Department of Engineering and Design, School of Engineering and Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QT, UK
m.langari@sussex.ac.uk

Zhiyin Yang

Department of Engineering, College of Engineering and Technology, University of Derby, Derby DE22 3AW, UK
z.yang@derby.ac.uk

Jean-Pierre Pirault

Department of Engineering and Design, School of Engineering and Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QT, UK
jpirault@my-inbox.net

Chris Long

Department of Engineering and Design, School of Engineering and Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QT, UK
sealong@btinternet.com

Jisjoe Thalackottore Jose

Department of Engineering and Design, School of Engineering and Informatics, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QT, UK
j.thalackottore-jose@sussex.ac.uk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039701 History: Received March 22, 2017; Revised January 30, 2018

Abstract

A novel approach is proposed for precise control of two-phase spray evaporative cooling for thermal management of road vehicle internal combustion engines. A reduced-order plant model is first constructed by combining published spray evaporative cooling correlations with approximate governing heat transfer equations appropriate for IC engine thermal management. Control requirements are specified to allow several objectives to be met simultaneously under different load conditions. A control system is proposed and modelled in abstract form to achieve spray evaporative cooling of a gasoline engine, with simplifying assumptions made about the characteristics of the coolant pump, spray nozzle, and condenser. The system effectiveness is tested by simulation to establish its ability to meet key requirements, particularly concerned with precision control during transients resulting from rapid engine load variation. The results confirm the robustness of the proposed control strategy in accurately tracking a specified temperature profile at various constant load conditions, and also in the presence of realistic transient load variation

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