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Research Papers

Different Configurations of Exhaust Gas Heat Recovery in Internal Combustion Engine: Evaluation on Different Driving Cycles Using Numerical Simulations

[+] Author and Article Information
Hanna Sara

Research Engineer,
Research Laboratory in Hydrodynamics,
Energy and Atmospheric Environment (LHEEA),
Ecole Centrale de Nantes,
Nantes 44300, France
e-mail: hanna.sara@ec-nantes.fr

David Chalet

Professor
Research Laboratory in Hydrodynamics,
Energy and Atmospheric Environment (LHEEA),
Ecole Centrale de Nantes,
Nantes 44300, France
e-mail: david.chalet@ec-nantes.fr

Mickaël Cormerais

Manager
Thermal Management Competence Center,
MANN+HUMMEL France,
Laval 53061, France
e-mail: mickael.cormerais@mann-hummel.com

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received October 27, 2017; final manuscript received January 4, 2018; published online April 10, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Matthew Oehlschlaeger.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 10(4), 041010 (Apr 10, 2018) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-17-1416; doi: 10.1115/1.4039304 History: Received October 27, 2017; Revised January 04, 2018

Exhaust gas heat recovery is one of the interesting thermal management strategies that aim to improve the cold start of the engine and thus reduce its fuel consumption. In this work, an overview of the heat exchanger used as well as the experimental setup and the different tests will be presented first. Then numerical simulations were run to assess and valorize the exhaust gas heat recovery strategy. The application was divided into three parts: an indirect heating of the oil with the coolant as a medium fluid, a direct heating of the oil, and direct heating of the oil and the coolant. Different ideas were tested over five different driving cycles: New European driving cycle (NEDC), worldwide harmonized light duty driving test cycle (WLTC), common Artemis driving cycle (CADC) (urban and highway), and one in-house developed cycle. The simulations were performed over two ambient temperatures. Different configurations were proposed to control the engine's lubricant maximum temperature. Results concerning the temperature profiles as well as the assessment of fuel consumption were stated for each case.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic presentation of the heat exchanger test bench

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Fig. 2

Heat exchanger data points

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Fig. 3

Heat exchanger efficiency with an intake air temperature of 300 °C

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Fig. 4

Model validation for 1500 rpm and 50 N·m

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Fig. 5

A schematic presentation of the exhaust gas heat recovery strategy applied on the coolant circuit (Exh heat: exhaust heat exchanger; TH: thermostat; Oil HE: oil heat exchanger; Ex tank: expansion tank; Rad: radiator)

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Fig. 6

In-house developed driving cycle

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Fig. 7

Indirect heating of the engine's lubricant over WLTC at 20 °C and −7 °C as an ambient temperatures: (a) temperature profile at 20 °C, (b) viscosity profile at 20 °C, (c) temperature profile at −7 °C, and (d) viscosity profile at −7 °C

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Fig. 8

A schematic presentation of the exhaust gas heat recovery strategy applied on the oil circuit (Exh heat: Exhaust heat exchanger; TH: thermostat; Oil HE: oil heat exchanger; Ex tank: expansion tank; Rad: radiator)

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Fig. 9

Direct heating of the engine's lubricant configuration A results over WLTC at both ambient temperature: (a) temperature profile at 20 °C, (b) temperature profile at −7 °C, (c) viscosity profile at 20 °C, and (d) viscosity profile at −7 °C

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Fig. 10

Friction power (configuration A) over WLTC at both ambient temperatures: (a) friction power at 20 °C and (b) friction power at −7 °C

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Fig. 11

A schematic presentation of the exhaust gas heat recovery strategy applied on the oil circuit (Exh heat: exhaust heat exchanger; TH: thermostat; Oil HE: oil heat exchanger; Ex tank: expansion tank; Rad: radiator)

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Fig. 12

Coolant and lubricant temperature profiles of the configuration B at an ambient temperature of 20 °C over WLTC

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Fig. 13

A schematic presentation of the exhaust gas heat recovery strategy applied on the oil circuit and the coolant circuit (Exh heat: exhaust heat exchanger; TH: thermostat; Oil HE: oil heat exchanger; Ex tank: expansion tank; Rad: radiator)

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Fig. 14

Temperature profile for two heat exchangers on the exhaust line

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Fig. 15

Fuel consumption savings for exhaust gas heat recovery for: different configurations, driving cycles, and ambient temperatures

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