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Research Papers

Heat Transfer Enhancement in Ferrofluids Flow in Micro and Macro Parallel Plate Channels: A Comparative Numerical Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Aditi Sengupta

Churchill College,
University of Cambridge,
Cambridge CB3 0DS, UK

P. S. Ghoshdastidar

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India
e-mail: psg@iitk.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received August 9, 2016; final manuscript received September 5, 2017; published online December 20, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Wei Li.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 10(2), 021012 (Dec 20, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-16-1220; doi: 10.1115/1.4038483 History: Received August 09, 2016; Revised September 05, 2017

This paper presents a comparative numerical study of heat transfer enhancement in steady, laminar, hydrodynamically fully developed flow of water-based ferrofluids under no magnetic field in micro and macro parallel plate channels subjected to constant equal heat fluxes on its top and bottom, considering Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis of ferroparticles in the base fluid. While the microchannel results match very well with the experimental data for water in an equivalent microtube (Kurtoglu et al., 2014, “Experimental Study on Convective Heat Transfer Performance of Iron Oxide Based Ferrofluids in Microtubes,” ASME J. Therm. Sci. Eng. Appl., 6(3), p. 034501.), the numerically predicted enhancement factor in ferrofluids is much below that for the same microtube. A detailed parametric study points to possible inaccuracies in the experimental results of Kurtoglu et al. (2014, “Experimental Study on Convective Heat Transfer Performance of Iron Oxide Based Ferrofluids in Microtubes,” ASME J. Therm. Sci. Eng. Appl., 6(3), p. 034501.) for ferrofluids. The nanoparticle concentration profiles in the microchannel flow reveal that (a) the nanoparticle concentration at the wall increases with axial distance, (b) the wall nanoparticle concentration decreases with increasing heat flux, and (c) the concentration profile of nanoparticles is parabolic at the exit. A comparison of thermally developing flow in microchannel and macrochannel of the same length (0.025 m) indicates that the enhancement factor at the microchannel exit is 1.089 which is only marginally higher than that at the macrochannel exit in the heat flux range of 20–80 kW/m2. On the other hand, for the thermally fully developed flow in both microchannel and macrochannel of the same length (0.54 m) the maximum enhancement factor for the macrochannel is 1.7, as compared to 1.1 for the microchannel, in the heat flux range of 1–4 kW/m2.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Physical problem and the computational domain

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Fig. 2

A sample grid independence for the microchannel for q″=7×105 W/m2 and φ=0.05

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the difference of the wall and bulk fluid temperature at the exit versus wall heat flux predicted by the present numerical simulation with the experimental data [17] for heat transfer in pure fluid (water) flow in a microtube

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Fig. 4

Temperature profiles in the microchannel for q″ = 5 × 105 W/m2 and ϕ= 0.05 at three different axial locations

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Fig. 5

Concentration profiles in the microchannel for q″= 5 × 105 W/m2 and ϕ= 0.05 at three different axial locations

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Fig. 6

Comparison of computed exit wall-fluid temperature difference in the microchannel with the experimental results for microtube [17] for ϕ= 5%

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Fig. 7

Comparison of the numerically predicted channel exit heat transfer coefficient with that for microtube [17] for ϕ= 5%

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Fig. 8

Axial variation of enhancement factor for q″ = 7 × 105 W/m2 and ϕ = 0.05 in the microchannel

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Fig. 9

Comparison of enhancement factor at the exit of the microchannel with that of microtube [17] for ϕ= 5%

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Fig. 10

Comparison of microchannel and macrochannel exit heat transfer coefficients in the thermally developing flow for ϕ=5%

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Fig. 11

Comparison of enhancement factor at the exit of the microchannel and macrochannel in the thermally developing flow for ϕ=5%

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the numerically predicted fully developed temperature profile (θ versus y) with the analytical solution for the macrochannel flow of pure fluid (water) at q″ = 1000 W/m2

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Fig. 13

Comparison of enhancement factor at the exit of the microchannel and macrochannel for ϕ=5% when the flow is thermally developed at the exit

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