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research-article

Onboard Device Encapsulatin with Two-phase Cooling

[+] Author and Article Information
Steven J. Young

General Dynamics Mission Systems, Bloomington, Minnesota 55431
Steven.Young@gd-ms.com

D Janssen

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455
janssenda@gmail.com

Everett Wenzel

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455
wenz0081@umn.edu

Brandon Shadakofsky

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455
shada006@umn.edu

Francis Kulacki

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455
kulacki@me.umn.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037130 History: Received August 04, 2016; Revised May 19, 2017

Abstract

Onboard liquid cooling of electronic devices is demonstrated with liquid delivered externally to the point of heat removal through a conformal encapsulation. The encapsulation creates a flat microgap above the integrated circuit and is a CFD-enabled design that delivers a uniform inlet coolant flow over the device. The coolant is NovecTM 7200, and the electronics are simulated with a resistance heater on a 1:1 scale. Thermal performance is demonstrated at power densities of ~ 1 KW/cm3 in the microgap. Parameters investigated are pressure drop, average device temperature, heat transfer coefficient and coefficient of performance. Nusselt numbers for gap sizes of 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mm are reduced to a dimensionless correlation. With low coolant inlet subcooling, two-phase heat transfer is seen at all mass flows. Device temperatures reach 95 oC for power dissipation of 50 - 80 W (0.67 - 1.08 KW/cm3) depending on coolant flow for a gap of 0.5 mm. Coefficients of performance of ~100 - 70,000 are determined via measured pressure drop and demonstrate a low pumping penalty at the device level within the range of power and coolant flow considered. The encapsulation with microgap flow boiling provides a means for use of higher power CPU and GPU devices and thereby enables higher computing performance, for example, in embedded airborne computers.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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