0
Research Papers

Thermal Management Issues in Operational Data Centers: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis and Experimental Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Babak Fakhim

Faculty of Engineering,
Military Technological College,
Muscat 111 Oman;
University of Portsmouth,
Portsmouth P01 2UP, UK
e-mail: Babak.fakhim@gmail.com

Srinarayana Nagarathinam

School of Aerospace, Mechanical,
and Mechatronic Engineering,
The University of Sydney,
Sydney NSW 2006, Australia
e-mail: Srinarayana.nagarathinam@sydney.edu.au

Steven W. Armfield

School of Aerospace, Mechanical,
and Mechatronic Engineering,
The University of Sydney,
Sydney NSW 2006, Australia
e-mail: Steven.armfield@sydney.edu.au

Masud Behnia

Macquarie Graduate School of Management,
Macquarie University,
Sydney 2109, Australia
e-mail: Masud.behnia@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received June 29, 2016; final manuscript received September 27, 2016; published online April 4, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ziad Saghir.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 9(3), 031009 (Apr 04, 2017) (6 pages) Paper No: TSEA-16-1186; doi: 10.1115/1.4035943 History: Received June 29, 2016; Revised September 27, 2016

The increase in the number of data centers in the last decade, combined with higher power density racks, has led to a significant increase in the associated total electricity consumption, which is compounded by cooling inefficiencies. Issues, such as hot air recirculation in the data center room environment, provide substantial challenges in thermal manageability. Three operational data centers have been studied to identify the cooling issues. Field measurements of temperature were obtained and were compared to numerical simulations to evaluate the overall thermal behavior of the data centers and to identify the thermal issues.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Racks arranged in a hot-aisle/cold-aisle configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

A schematic of the experimental apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Operational DC1 layout

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Operational DC2 layout

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Operational DC3 layout

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Variation of the maximum temperature in the data center with grid size for (a) DC1, (b) DC2, and (c) DC3

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Numerical and experimental temperature fields on a horizontal plane 1.8 m above the raised-floor for DC1: (a) numerical modeling and (b) field measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Numerical streamlines on a horizontal plane 1.8 m above the raised-floor for DC1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Numerical and experimental temperature fields on a horizontal plane 1.8 m above the raised-floor for DC2: (a) numerical modeling and (b) field measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Numerical streamlines on a horizontal plane 1.8 m above the raised-floor for DC2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Numerical and experimental temperature fields on a horizontal plane 1.8 m above the raised-floor for DC3: (a) numerical modeling and (b) field measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Numerical streamlines on a horizontal plane 1.8 m above the raised-floor for DC3

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In