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Research Papers

Effects of Nanoparticle Shape on Slot-Jet Impingement Cooling of a Corrugated Surface With Nanofluids

[+] Author and Article Information
Fatih Selimefendigil

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Celal Bayar University,
Manisa 45140, Turkey
e-mail: fatih.selimefendigil@cbu.edu.tr

Hakan F. Öztop

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Technology Faculty,
Firat University,
Elaziğ 23119, Turkey
e-mail: hfoztop1@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received June 30, 2016; final manuscript received November 24, 2016; published online March 15, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Sandra Boetcher.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 9(2), 021016 (Mar 15, 2017) (8 pages) Paper No: TSEA-16-1193; doi: 10.1115/1.4035811 History: Received June 30, 2016; Revised November 24, 2016

Numerical study of jet impingement cooling of a corrugated surface with water–SiO2 nanofluid of different nanoparticle shapes was performed. The bottom wall is corrugated and kept at constant surface temperature, while the jet emerges from a rectangular slot with cold uniform temperature. The finite volume method is utilized to solve the governing equations. The effects of Reynolds number (between 100 and 500), corrugation amplitude (between 0 and 0.3), corrugation frequency (between 0 and 20), nanoparticle volume fraction (between 0 and 0.04), and nanoparticle shapes (spherical, blade, brick, and cylindrical) on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics were studied. Stagnation point and average Nusselt number enhance with Reynolds number and solid particle volume fraction for both flat and corrugated surface configurations. An optimal value for the corrugation amplitude and frequency was found to maximize the average heat transfer at the highest value of Reynolds number. Among various nanoparticle shapes, cylindrical ones perform the best heat transfer characteristics in terms of stagnation and average Nusselt number values. At the highest solid volume concentration of the nanoparticles, heat transfer values are higher for a corrugated surface when compared to a flat surface case.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic description of the physical model and boundary conditions

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Fig. 2

Comparison of the local Nusselt number distribution along the bottom wall at Reynolds number of 250 with the results of Ref. [39]

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Fig. 3

Effects of Reynolds number on the streamline and isotherm distributions with cylindrical nanoparticles for a flat surface (ϕ=0.02): (a) Re = 100, (b) Re = 300, (c) Re = 500, (d) Re = 100, (e) Re = 300, and (e) Re = 300

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Fig. 4

Local Nusselt number distributions along the hot surface for various Reynolds numbers with cylindrical nanoparticles at (ϕ=0.02): (a) local Nusselt number, flat surface (A = 0 and f = 0) and (b) local Nusselt number, corrugated surface (A = 0.2 and f = 5)

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Fig. 5

Influence of surface corrugation amplitude on the streamline and isotherm distributions with cylindrical nanoparticles (Re = 400, f = 5, and ϕ=0.02): (a) A = 0, (b) A = 0.1, (c) A = 0.2, (d) A = 0.3, (e) A = 0, (f) A = 0.1, (g) A = 0.2, and (h) A = 0.3

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Fig. 6

Effects of surface corrugation amplitude on the Nusselt number distributions along the hot surface with cylindrical nanoparticles at (Re = 400, f = 5, and ϕ=0.02): (a) local Nusselt number, (b) maximum Nusselt number, and (c) averaged Nusselt number

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Fig. 7

Effects of surface corrugation frequency on the streamline and isotherm distributions with cylindrical nanoparticles (Re = 400, A = 0.2, and ϕ=0.02): (a) f = 0, (b) f = 5, (c) f = 10, (d) f = 20, (e) f = 0, (f) f = 5, (g) f = 10, and (h) f = 20

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Fig. 8

Nusselt number distributions along the hot surface for various corrugated surface frequencies with cylindrical nanoparticles (Re = 400, f = 5, and ϕ=0.02): (a) local Nusselt number, (b) maximum Nusselt number, and (c) averaged Nusselt number

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Fig. 9

Influence of nanoparticle shape effects on the maximum Nusselt number distributions along the hot surface for various nanoparticle volume fractions at Re = 400: (a) flat surface and (b) corrugated surface—A = 0.2 and f = 5

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Fig. 10

Influence of nanoparticle shape effects on the average Nusselt number distributions along the hot surface for various nanoparticle volume fractions at Re = 400: (a) flat surface and (b) corrugated surface—A = 0.2 and f = 5

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