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Technical Brief

Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Shock-Film Cooling Interaction on a Turbine Blade With Fan-Shaped Cooling Holes

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Xue

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: xuesong@vt.edu

A. Arisi

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: arisi@vt.edu

W. Ng

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University,
Blacksburg, VA 24061
e-mail: wng@vt.edu

1Corresponding author.

2Currently at Techsburg Inc. in Christiansburg, VA 24073; email: sxue@techsburg.com.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received February 7, 2015; final manuscript received June 10, 2015; published online September 22, 2015. Assoc. Editor: John C. Chai.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(4), 044502 (Sep 22, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: TSEA-15-1038; doi: 10.1115/1.4031465 History: Received February 07, 2015; Revised June 10, 2015

This paper presents the findings of an experimental and numerical investigation on the shock effect on heat transfer coefficient and film-cooling effectiveness. In this study, coolant was injected on the blade surface through a fan-shaped hole in a transonic cascade. The experimental results indicate that on the film-cooled suction surface of the blade, the shock from the adjacent blade impinging on the suction surface causes the film-cooling effectiveness to drop quickly by 18%, and then stay at a low level downstream of the shock. The shock also causes the local heat transfer coefficient to decrease rapidly by 25%, but then rise back up immediately after the shock. The results from the numerical study supported the film-cooling effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient trends that were observed in the experiment. A detailed analysis of the numerical results reveals that the rapid change of the film-cooling effectiveness is due to the near surface secondary flows, which push the hot mainstream air toward the injection centerline and lifts the low temperature core away from the surface. This secondary flow is a result of a spanwise pressure gradient. The drop in heat transfer coefficient is caused by a boundary layer separation bubble which results from an adverse streamwise pressure gradient at the shock position.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Test blade and fan-shaped hole geometry

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Fig. 2

Mach number distributions comparison between numerical and experimental results

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Fig. 3

Film cooling effectiveness comparison between numerical and experimental results

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Fig. 4

Heat transfer coefficient comparison between numerical and experimental results

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Fig. 5

Cross stream vector plot and streamwise velocity colormap at different distance from SS injection. (a) sinject/d = 1.0, (b) sinject/d = 3.0, (c) sinject/d = 6.0.

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Fig. 6

Cross stream contour of Mach number at 2.0d upstream of the shock

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Fig. 7

Suction surface 2D contour map of (a) Eta and (b) HTC

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Fig. 8

Secondary flow velocity vector and static temperature color map (a) 1.0d before shock, (b) at shock, and (c) 1.0d after shock

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