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Research Papers

Laminar Mixed Convective Heat Transfer in a Shallow Inclined Lid-Driven Cavity Filled With Nanofluid

[+] Author and Article Information
Habib Salahi

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Islamic Azad University,
Khomeinishahr Branch,
Isfahan, Iran
e-mail: habib.salahi@iaukhsh.ac.ir

Muhammad A. R. Sharif

Mem. ASME
Aerospace Engineering and
Mechanics Department,
The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0280
e-mail: msharif@eng.ua.edu

Saeid Rasouli

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Islamic Azad University,
Khomeinishahr Branch,
Isfahan, Iran
e-mail: Saeid.Rasouli@iaukhsh.ac.ir

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received February 17, 2015; final manuscript received July 11, 2015; published online September 10, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Giulio Lorenzini.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(4), 041016 (Sep 10, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: TSEA-15-1044; doi: 10.1115/1.4031221 History: Received February 17, 2015; Revised July 11, 2015

Laminar mixed convection in a two-dimensional shallow inclined lid-driven cavity is investigated numerically. The moving cavity lid at the top is isothermally hot and the bottom is isothermally cold while the two sidewalls are insulated. The cavity aspect ratio is taken as 10. The fluid medium consists of a mixture of pure water and copper nanoparticles with volumetric concentrations of 5% and 8%. The flow Richardson number is varied from 0.1 to 10, and the cavity inclination is varied from 0 deg to 30 deg. It is found that, at any specific nanoparticle concentration, the average Nusselt number increases mildly with cavity inclination for the forced convection dominated case (Ri = 0.1) while it increases much more rapidly with inclination for natural convection dominated case (Ri = 10). Also the average Nusselt number has significant increasing trend with increasing concentration of the nanoparticles.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the cavity configuration

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Fig. 2

Comparison of the average Nusselt number at the hot lid predicted by the present computation with that of Abu-Nada and Chamkha [35]

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Fig. 4

Evolution of the streamlines in the cavity with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction, φ, and cavity inclination, γ, for cavity aspect ratio A = 10 and Richardson number Ri = 0.1

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Fig. 3

(a) Convergence of the local Nusselt number distribution along the hot and cold cavity surfaces with mesh refinement and (b) convergence of the average Nusselt number at the hot and cold cavity surfaces with mesh refinement

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Fig. 15

(Top) local Nusselt number distribution along the hot and cold surface for different cavity aspect ratios and (bottom) variation of the average Nusselt number with aspect ratio

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Fig. 14

(Top) average Nusselt number variation against nanoparticle volume fraction and (bottom) average Nusselt number variation against Richardson number

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Fig. 13

Average Nusselt number variation against cavity inclination

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Fig. 12

Local Nusselt number distribution along the hot and cold surfaces of the cavity for various combinations of the flow and geometric parameters; Ri = 10

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Fig. 11

Local Nusselt number distribution along the hot and cold surfaces of the cavity for various combinations of the flow and geometric parameters; Ri = 1

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Fig. 10

Local Nusselt number distribution along the hot and cold surfaces of the cavity for various combinations of the flow and geometric parameters; Ri = 0.1

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Fig. 9

Evolution of the isotherms in the cavity with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction, φ, and cavity inclination, γ, for cavity aspect ratio A = 10 and Richardson number Ri = 10

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Fig. 8

Evolution of the isotherms in the cavity with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction, φ, and cavity inclination, γ, for cavity aspect ratio A = 10 and Richardson number Ri = 1

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Fig. 7

Evolution of the isotherms in the cavity with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction, φ, and cavity inclination, γ, for cavity aspect ratio A = 10 and Richardson number Ri = 0.1

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Fig. 6

Evolution of the streamlines in the cavity with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction, φ, and cavity inclination, γ, for cavity aspect ratio A = 10 and Richardson number Ri = 10

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Fig. 5

Evolution of the streamlines in the cavity with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction, φ, and cavity inclination, γ, for cavity aspect ratio A = 10 and Richardson number Ri = 1

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