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Research Papers

Conjugate Heat Transfer Study of Turbulent Slot Impinging Jet

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Madhusudana Achari

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India

Manab Kumar Das

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India
e-mail: manab@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received February 24, 2015; final manuscript received May 25, 2015; published online July 14, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Bengt Sunden.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(4), 041011 (Dec 01, 2015) (17 pages) Paper No: TSEA-15-1051; doi: 10.1115/1.4030882 History: Received February 24, 2015; Revised May 25, 2015; Online July 14, 2015

Conjugate heat transfer in a two-dimensional, steady, incompressible, confined, turbulent slot jet impinging normally on a flat plate of finite thickness is one of the important problems as it mimics closely with industrial applications. The standard high Reynolds number two-equation k–ε eddy viscosity model has been used as the turbulence model. The turbulence intensity and the Reynolds number considered at the inlet are 2% and 15,000, respectively. The bottom face of the impingement plate is maintained at a constant temperature higher than the jet exit temperature and subjected with constant heat flux for the two cases considered in the study. The confinement plate is considered to be adiabatic. A parametric study has been done by analyzing the effect of nozzle-to-plate distance (4–8), Prandtl number of the fluid (0.1–100), thermal conductivity ratio of solid to fluid (1–1000), and impingement plate thickness (1–10) on distribution of solid–fluid interface temperature, bottom surface temperature (for constant heat flux case), local Nusselt number, and local heat flux. Effort has been given to relate the heat transfer behavior with the flow field. The crossover of distribution of local Nusselt number and local heat flux in a specified region when plotted for different nozzle-to-plate distances has been discussed. It is found that the Nusselt number distribution for different thermal conductivity ratios of solid-to-fluid and impingement plate thicknesses superimposed with each other indicating that the Nusselt number as a fluid flow property remains independent of solid plate properties.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of a single confined turbulent slot impinging jet: (a) physical domain of the impinging jet and (b) computational domain of the impinging jet

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Fig. 2

Streamwise velocity at X = 7 for full domain and half domain

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Fig. 3

Grid independence test: (a) H = 4, (b) H = 6, and (c) H = 8

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Fig. 4

Typical grid distribution zoomed near the stagnation region

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Fig. 5

Validation of the present code. (a) Comparison of simulated Nusselt number to the experimental data from van Heiningen [35] and (b) comparison of simulated Nusselt number to the experimental data from Gardon and Akfirat [43] and Cadek [44].

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Fig. 6

Streamline and velocity vector distribution (H = 6): (a) streamline plot and (b) vector plot

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Fig. 7

Zoomed view of streamlines in the stagnation region (H = 6)

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Fig. 8

Temperature contour plot (H = 6): (a) bottom surface maintained at constant temperature and (b) bottom surface applied with constant heat flux

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Fig. 9

Interface temperature (θi) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 10

Interface temperature (θi) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (c) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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Fig. 11

Nusselt number (NuX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 12

Nusselt number (NuX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (c) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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Fig. 13

Heat transfer (qX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 14

Heat transfer (qX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (c) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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Fig. 15

Bottom surface temperature (θb) distribution for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 16

Interface temperature (θi) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 17

Nusselt number (NuX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 18

Heat transfer (qX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for different nozzle-to-plate distances (H): (a) Pr = 0.1, S = 10, and K = 1000; (b) Pr = 1, S = 10, and K = 1000; and (c) Pr = 100, S = 10, and K = 1000

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Fig. 19

Bottom surface temperature (θb) distribution for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) S = 10 and K = 1000, (c) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (d) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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Fig. 20

Interface temperature (θi) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) S = 10 and K = 1000, (c) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (d) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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Fig. 21

Nusselt number (NuX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (c) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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Fig. 22

Heat transfer (qX) distribution at the solid–fluid interface for H = 6: (a) S = 10 and K = 1000, (b) Pr = 1 and S = 10, and (c) Pr = 1 and K = 1000

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