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Research Papers

Pressure Surge During Cryogenic Feedline Chilldown Process

[+] Author and Article Information
Gagan Agrawal

Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, ISRO,
Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala, India
e-mail: agl.gagan@gmail.com

S. Sunil Kumar

Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, ISRO,
Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala, India
e-mail: sunil_plamood@yahoo.com

Deepak Kumar Agarwal

Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, ISRO,
Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala, India
e-mail: dagarwal_iitk@yahoo.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received April 24, 2014; final manuscript received June 5, 2015; published online November 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: P. K. Das.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 8(1), 011005 (Nov 11, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1082; doi: 10.1115/1.4030840 History: Received April 24, 2014

Cryogenic fluid entering a warm feedline absorbs heat and undergoes rapid flash evaporation leading to pressure surges, which can retard the flow inside the feedline. It may have serious repercussion in operation of the rocket engine during start up. Experimental and numerical studies are carried out to examine the effect of inlet pressure and initial feedline temperature on pressure surges. An analytical model using sinda/fluint software is developed to investigate this complex two-phase flow phenomenon including the various boiling regimes that exist during line chilling. The numerical study is carried out considering 1D flow through a cryogenic feedline of 2.47 m long and 0.01 m inner diameter with liquid nitrogen at 77.3 K as working fluid. Predictions are made for the inlet pressure in the range of 0.28–0.76 MPa and initial wall temperature of 200 K and 300 K. Subsequently, an experimental test rig is setup and the model is validated with the experimental data. The studies show that within the range of parameter considered, the magnitude of pressure surge increases exponentially with increase in inlet pressure and decreases with the prechilling of feedline.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Flow and thermal model for cryogenic feedline chilling

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Fig. 3

Pressure surge at 0.28 MPa inlet pressure

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Fig. 4

Pressure surges at various inlet pressures

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Fig. 5

Maximum surge pressure at various inlet pressures

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Fig. 6

Time of occurrence of maximum surge pressure at various inlet pressures

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Fig. 7

Comparison in numerical data and literature data of pressure surge

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Fig. 8

Comparison in numerical data and in-house experimental data of pressure surge

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Fig. 9

Pressure surge in feedline for various inlet pressure

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Fig. 10

Surface and fluid temperature at line exit for inlet pressure of 0.45 MPa

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Fig. 11

Vapor fraction at line exit for inlet pressure of 0.45 MPa

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Fig. 12

Surface temperature at different locations for inlet pressure of 0.45 MPa

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Fig. 13

Fluid velocity at line exit for inlet pressure of 0.45 MPa

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Fig. 14

Wall temperature at line exit for different inlet pressure

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Fig. 15

Wall temperature at line exit for different initial line temperature

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Fig. 16

Pressure surge in feedline for various initial line temperatures

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