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Research Papers

Radiative Heat Transfer and Fluorescence Measurements in Laminar Prevaporized Canola Methyl Ester/Diesel Blend Flames

[+] Author and Article Information
V. Singh, R. N. Parthasarathy, S. R. Gollahalli

School of Aerospace and
Mechanical Engineering,
University of Oklahoma,
Norman, OK 73019

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received April 25, 2014; final manuscript received April 7, 2015; published online November 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Chakravarthy Balaji.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 8(1), 011006 (Nov 11, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1085; doi: 10.1115/1.4030701 History: Received April 25, 2014

Biofuels, such as canola methyl ester (CME), continue to receive considerable attention for their potential use as alternatives to petroleum diesel fuel. The studies on the application of biofuels in internal combustion engines, in general, have shown a considerable reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), soot, and radiative heat emissions, and a small increase in NOx emissions. Radiative heat transfer from flames, which is important in applications such as gas turbines and glass-manufacturing furnaces, has received little attention. The objective of this investigation was to document radiative heat transfer and radical and gas concentration measurements to understand the dominant mechanism of heat transfer in CME/diesel blend flames. In order to isolate the fuel chemical effects on the combustion characteristics of fuels, laminar flames of prevaporized liquid fuels were studied at injector-exit equivalence ratios of 1.2, 2, 3, and 7. Measurements of radiative heat transfer and flame structure including OH and CH radical concentration field were completed. While the peak temperatures in the various blend flames were comparable at the same equivalence ratio, the total flame radiation decreased with the increase in CME concentration in the fuel. Estimates of radiation from gaseous species and soot indicated that about 27–30% of the radiation was from gases, and the rest from soot. The gaseous species contribution to the flame radiation increased slightly with the biofuel content in the blend.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Radiative fraction of heat release in CME-blended flames

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Fig. 3

Temperature profiles in CME blend flames at ϕ = 2: (a) B25 flame, (b) B50 flame, and (c) B75 flame

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Fig. 4

Soot volume concentration profiles in CME blend flames at ϕ = 2: (a) B25 flame, (b) B50 flame, and (c) B75 flame

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Fig. 5

PLIF images of OH radical concentration in the blend flames: (a) B25 flame, (b) B50 flame, and (c) B75 flame

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Fig. 6

PLIF images of CH radical concentration in the blend flames: (a) B25 flame, (b) B50 flame, and (c) B75 flame

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Fig. 7

CO2 concentration profiles in blend flames at Ф = 2: (a) B25 flame, (b) B50 flame, and (c) B75 flame

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Fig. 8

CO concentration profiles in blend flames at Ф = 2: (a) B25 flame, (b) B50 flame, and (c) B75 flame

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