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Research Papers

Minimizing Tissue Surface Overheating Using Convective Cooling During Laser-Induced Thermal Therapy: A Numerical Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Rupesh Singh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IIT Guwahati,
Guwahati, Assam 781039, India
e-mail: rupesh.s@iitg.ernet.in

Koushik Das

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IIT Guwahati,
Guwahati, Assam 781039, India
e-mail: koushik.iitg@gmail.com

Subhash C. Mishra

Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
IIT Guwahati,
Guwahati, Assam 781039, India
e-mail: scm_iitg@yahoo.com

Junnosuke Okajima

Institute of Fluid Science,
Tohoku University,
2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku,
Sendai, Japan
e-mail: okajima@pixy.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

Shigenao Maruyama

Institute of Fluid Science,
Tohoku University,
2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku,
Sendai, Japan
e-mail: maruyama@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received April 12, 2014; final manuscript received December 16, 2014; published online November 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Bengt Sunden.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 8(1), 011002 (Nov 11, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1073; doi: 10.1115/1.4030698 History: Received April 12, 2014

Laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) is a noninvasive medical procedure for treatment of tumors and small lesion. Skin surface overheating and thermal damage to the undesired areas of tissue are two major concerns during thermal therapy. To determine the efficacy of forced convection surface cooling, the present study demonstrates the numerical simulation for minimizing undesired thermal damage. A two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric cylindrical model is considered with irradiation of continuous wave (cw) laser beam. Bioheat transfer equation in conjunction with radiative transfer equation (RTE) is solved using the finite volume method (FVM) and the discrete ordinate method (DOM). Effect of variation in surface cooling on tissue temperature distribution is studied.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of a single-layered (a) cylindrical tissue domain and (b) 2D computational plane along with the boundary conditions

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Fig. 2

(a) Nondimensional heat flux at the outer boundary of cylinder and (b) steady-state centerline temperature (r = 0,0≤z≤Z) in a 2D cylindrical

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Fig. 3

(a) Comparison of centerline temperature profiles at different time-steps and (b) temperature contour at time t = 5.0 s, without surface cooling (h = 0.0 W m-2 K)

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Fig. 4

(a) Comparison of centerline temperature profiles at different time-steps and (b) 2D temperature contour with surface cooling (h = 500 W m-2 K)

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Fig. 5

(a) Comparison of centerline temperature profiles at different time-steps and (b) 2D temperature contour with surface cooling (h = 1600 W m-2 K)

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Fig. 6

Variation of centerline temperature profile for various h, at time-step (a) t = 0.5 s and (b) t =  1 .0 s

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Fig. 7

Variation of tissue surface temperature profile for various h, at time-step (a) t = 1.0 s and (b) t =  2.0 s

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