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Research Papers

Heat and Mass Transfer in Planar Anode-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Effects of Interconnect Fuel/Oxidant Channel Flow Cross Section

[+] Author and Article Information
Raj M. Manglik

Thermal-Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072
e-mail: Raj.Manglik@uc.edu

Yogesh N. Magar

Thermal-Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical and
Materials Engineering,
University of Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, OH 45221-0072
e-mail: Yogesh.Magar@us.bosch.com

See Refs. [46,47] for detailed descriptions of these wall-heat-transfer boundary conditions in the context of classical heat exchanger theory, and the associated forced convection in ducts.

1Corresponding author.

2Present address: Robert Bosch LLC, 601 NW 65th CT, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received May 27, 2014; final manuscript received April 27, 2015; published online June 9, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Bengt Sunden.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(4), 041003 (Dec 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1132; doi: 10.1115/1.4030636 History: Received May 27, 2014; Revised April 27, 2015; Online June 09, 2015

Heat and mass transfer in a planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) module, with bipolar-plate interconnect flow channels of different shapes are computationally simulated. The electrochemistry is modeled by uniform supply of volatile species (moist hydrogen) and oxidant (air) to the electrolyte surface with constant reaction rate via interconnect channels of rectangular, trapezoidal, and triangular cross sections. The governing three-dimensional equations for fluid mass, momentum, energy, and species transport, along with those for electrochemical kinetics, where the homogeneous porous-layer flow is in thermal equilibrium with the solid matrix, are coupled with the electrochemical reaction rate to properly account for the heat and mass transfer across flow-ducts and electrode-interfaces. The results highlight effects of interconnect duct shapes on lateral temperature and species distributions as well as the attendant frictional losses and heat transfer coefficients. It is seen that a relatively shallow rectangular duct offers better heat and mass transfer performance to affect improved thermal management of a planar SOFC.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic representation of a typical planar solid oxide fuel cell: (a) single cell stack or module and (b) stack dimensional configuration and volatile species/oxidant transport

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Fig. 2

Physical and computational domains of planar SOFC stack modules with interconnect channels of different cross-sectional shape but fixed aspect ratio: (a) rectangular, (b) trapezoidal, and (c) triangular channel

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Fig. 3

Heat transfer or Nu characteristics of fuel and oxidant flows in anode- and cathode-side interconnect channels of different cross-sectional shapes

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Fig. 4

Friction factor or (f Re) characteristics of fuel and oxidant flows in anode- and cathode-side interconnect channels of different cross-sectional shapes

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Fig. 5

Variations with anode-layer thickness in heat transfer coefficient (Nu) and friction factor (f Re) in fuel and oxidant flows in anode-side interconnect channels of a rectangular cross section in a planar SOFC stack

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Fig. 6

Temperature distribution in planar SOFC stacks (λa = 1.33, λc = 0.066) with interconnect channels of different cross-sectional shapes (γ = 2.0): (a) triangular (θ = 45 deg), (b) trapezoidal (θ = 60 deg), (c) trapezoidal (θ = 75 deg), and (d) rectangular (θ = 90 deg)

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Fig. 7

Distribution of fuel or H2 mass fraction concentration in anode (λa = 1.33) layer and interconnect channels of different cross-sectional shapes (γ = 2.0): (a) triangular (θ = 45 deg), (b) trapezoidal (θ = 75 deg), and (c) rectangular (θ = 90 deg)

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Fig. 8

Distribution of H2O mass fraction concentration in anode (λa = 1.33) layer and interconnect channels of different cross-sectional shapes (γ = 2.0): (a) triangular (θ = 45 deg), (b) trapezoidal (θ = 75 deg), and (c) rectangular (θ = 90 deg)

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Fig. 9

Effects of interconnect channel cross-sectional shape and anode-layer thickness on the optimization of thermal–hydrodynamic characteristics of fuel and oxidant flows in anode-supported planar SOFC stack

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