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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Numerical Study of a Low Head Direct Chill Slab Caster for Aluminum Alloy AA5052

[+] Author and Article Information
Mainul Hasan

Mem. ASME
Department of Mining and Materials Engineering,
McGill University,
M. H. Wong Building, 3610 University Street,
Montreal, QC H3A 0C5, Canada
e-mail: Mainul.hasan@mcgill.ca

Latifa Begum

Department of Mining and Materials Engineering,
McGill University,
M. H. Wong Building, 3610 University Street,
Montreal, QC H3A 0C5, Canada
e-mail: Latifa.begum@mail.mcgill.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received August 5, 2014; final manuscript received November 28, 2014; published online January 28, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Steve Cai.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(2), 021008 (Jun 01, 2015) (15 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1181; doi: 10.1115/1.4029478 History: Received August 05, 2014; Revised November 28, 2014; Online January 28, 2015

A 3D numerical study is carried out for a vertical direct chill (DC) rolling ingot caster for an aluminum alloy (AA-5052). The model incorporated the coupled turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the casting process. The caster consists of a low-head hot-top mold. The melt is assumed to have been delivered through the entire top cross section of the caster. The previously verified in-house computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is used to investigate the effects of the important parameters such as casting speed, inlet melt superheat, and mold-metal contact effective heat transfer coefficient (HTC) on the low-head casting process. It is found that the sump depth (SD), liquid depth, and mushy thickness (MT) at the center of the ingot increase linearly with the casting speed while the shell thickness (ST) at the exit of the mold decreases linearly with the casting speed. Useful correlations concerning the above quantities with casting speed have been provided for the benefit of DC casting operators.

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References

Grealy, G. P., Davis, J. L., Jensen, E. K., and Moritz, P. A. T. J., 2001, “Advances for DC Ingot Casting: Part 2—Heat Transfer and Casting Results,” Light Metals, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, Warrendale, PA, pp. 813–821.
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Begum, L., 2013, “3-D Transport Phenomena in Vertical Direct Chill Casting Processes,” Ph.D. thesis, Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Schematic of the DC caster and the computational domain for an open-top melt feeding scheme and (b) grid points distribution (60 × 42 × 24) in the computational domain

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Fig. 2

3D surface plots of temperature and velocity fields for four cases (1)–(4). (i) us = 60 mm/min: (a) temperature contours and (b) velocity field, (ii) us = 100 mm/min: (c) temperature contours and (d) velocity field, (iii) us = 140 mm/min: (e) temperature contours and (f) velocity field, and (iv) us = 180 mm/min: (g) temperature contours and (h) velocity field

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Fig. 3

Longitudinal 2D views of temperature contours and velocity vectors for case 1: (a) z = 0 mm, (b) z = 62.5 mm, and (c) z = 312.5 mm

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Fig. 4

Longitudinal 2D views of temperature contours and velocity vectors for case 2: (a) z = 0 mm, (b) z = 62.5 mm, and (c) z = 312.5 mm

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Fig. 5

Longitudinal 2D views of temperature contours and velocity vectors for case 3: (a) z = 0 mm, (b) z = 62.5 mm, and (c) z = 312.5 mm

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Fig. 6

Longitudinal 2D views of temperature contours and velocity vectors for case 4: (a) z = 0 mm, (b) z = 62.5 mm, and (c) z = 312.5 mm

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Fig. 7

Contours of solidus and liquidus temperatures at various transverse cross-sectional planes for four cases (1)–(4): (a) casting speed = 60 mm/min, (b) casting speed = 100 mm/min, (c) casting speed = 140 mm/min, and (d) casting speed = 180 mm/min

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Fig. 8

ST at the middle of the slab faces at the mold exit versus casting speed for cases (1)–(4)

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Fig. 9

Variations of surface temperature along the axial direction of the strand at four locations of the caster for: (a) casting speed (us) = 60 mm min−1 (case 1) and (b) casting speed (us) = 180 mm min−1 (case 4)

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Fig. 10

ST at the middle of the narrow face at the mold exit versus effective HTC (W/(m2 K)) for six cases (1, 4, and 5–8)

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Fig. 11

ST at the middle of the narrow face at the mold exit versus melt superheat (°C) for six cases (1, 4, and 9–12)

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