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Research Papers

Modification of Shock Resistance for Cutting Tools Using Functionally Graded Concept in Multilayer Coating

[+] Author and Article Information
M. R. Vaziri

Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 11365-4563, Iran
e-mail: m.vaziri@ut.ac.ir

S. M. Nowruzpour Mehrian, M. H. Naei

Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 11365-4563, Iran

Jamal Y. Sheikh Ahmad

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The Petroleum Institute,
Abu Dhabi 2533, UAE
e-mail: jahmad@pi.ac.ae

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received July 30, 2014; final manuscript received September 29, 2014; published online November 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Steve Cai.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(1), 011014 (Mar 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1175; doi: 10.1115/1.4028982 History: Received July 30, 2014; Revised September 29, 2014; Online November 25, 2014

In this study, thermal analysis and optimization of the material composition in functionally graded (FG) cutting tools were carried out to achieve the minimum thermal stress. Since cutting tool particularly rotating ones in milling process are exposed to thermal shock during machining, a complicated analysis is required to analyze the thermal shock response. Therefore, a generalized coupled thermoelasticity theory of Lord–Shulman based on second sound effect is adopted. Lord–Shulman theory, as a generalized coupled thermoelasticity, is chosen as governing equation in terms of temperature and displacement. The coupled equations are transferred to Laplace domain and then Galerkin finite element method is employed to solve the equation in the Laplace domain. Then, a numerical Laplace inversion has been applied to transform back the equation from Laplace domain to real time. Results are obtained for several material compositions so that the proper composition will be found for design. It is shown that FG materials (FGMs) exhibit lower stresses, lower displacement, and lower temperature levels compared to multilayer materials. Furthermore, the effect of FGM is increased by increasing the power law index, representing the change in concentration.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Multilayer coated and FG cutting tool

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Fig. 2

FG cutting tool and the mechanical model of the graded region

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Fig. 3

Periodic thermal shock profile for rotating cutting tool

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Fig. 4

Applied thermal shock profile on the cutting tool versus nondimensional time

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Fig. 5

Variation of the metal volume fraction based on dimensionless normal direction

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Fig. 6

The base element and the linear Lagrangian shape function

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Fig. 7

Displacement distribution of cutting tool tip made of WC along nondimensional x for three different dimensionless times when n = 0

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Fig. 8

Distribution of nondimensional temperature along nondimensional x direction for n = 1 and different values of nondimensional time

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Fig. 9

Distribution of nondimensional displacement along x direction for n = 1

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Fig. 10

Distribution of nondimensional normal stress along nondimensional x direction for n = 1

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Fig. 11

Nondimensional variation of temperature for a point located at the middle of the graded part in cutting tool for different power law indices versus nondimensional time

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Fig. 12

Nondimensional variation of displacement for a point located at the middle of the graded part in cutting tool for different value of n versus nondimensional time

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Fig. 13

Nondimensional stress variation for a point located at the middle of the part in cutting tool for different value of n versus nondimensional time

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Fig. 14

Influence of the nondimensional reference temperature (coupling factor) on variation of nondimensional displacement and temperature for a point located at the middle of the graded region

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Fig. 15

Variation of nondimensional temperature for a point located at the middle of the region based on classical and generalized theory of coupled thermoelasticity versus nondimensional time for n = 1

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Fig. 16

Variation of nondimensional temperature for a point located at the middle of the graded region based generalized theory of coupled thermoelasticity versus nondimensional time for cutting tool made of FG and multilayer coating for n = 1

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Fig. 17

Variation of nondimensional normal stress for a point located at the middle of the graded region based generalized theory of coupled thermoelasticity versus nondimensional time for cutting tool made of FG and multilayer coating for n = 1

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