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Research Papers

Numerical Simulation and Parametric Study of Heat-Driven Self-Cooling of Electronic Devices

[+] Author and Article Information
Robel Kiflemariam

Department of Mechanical
and Materials Engineering,
Florida International University,
10555 W. Flagler St., EC-3445,
Miami, FL 33174

Cheng-Xian Lin

Department of Mechanical
and Materials Engineering,
Florida International University,
10555 W. Flagler St., EC-3445,
Miami, FL 33174
e-mail: lincx@fiu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received April 2, 2014; final manuscript received October 18, 2014; published online November 11, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Samuel Sami.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(1), 011008 (Mar 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1062; doi: 10.1115/1.4028906 History: Received April 02, 2014; Revised October 18, 2014; Online November 11, 2014

A heat-driven self-cooling system could potentially utilize the heat dissipated from a device to power a thermo-electric generator (TEG) which could then provide power to run a cooling system. In this paper, numerical simulation and parametric analysis of the geometrical parameters (such as fin density and height) and system parameters are conducted to better understand the performance of the self-cooling system within wide ranges. The study showed further decrease in device temperature could be achieved by using shunt operation instead of direct contact between the device and the TEG module. The use of TEG cascades could also help improve the decrease in power generation as a result of shunt arrangement.

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Figures

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Fig. 3

Workflow of the simulation method

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Fig. 2

(a) BM, (b) MM, (c) sectional view AA of modified model with single stage TEGs (MMa), (d) sectional view A-A of modified model with double cascade TEGs (MMb), and (e) sectional view A-A of modified model with triple cascade (MMc) TEGs Key: (1) Hot plates, (2) heater (between hot plates), (3) spreaders, (4) TEGs, (5) main fin heat sink (Fin-m), (6) auxiliary-fin heat sink (Fin-a), and (7) fan

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Fig. 4

Comparison between numerical model and experimental data by Martínez et al. [20]

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Fig. 5

Cooling fan performance and power consumed by the fan as a function of volume rate of air in the fan for different fin density. The subscripts 1.5, 2.1, and 2.6 represent Nfin equal to 1.5 fins/cm, 2.1 fins/cm, and 2.6 fins/cm, respectively. The subscripts 4 V, 8 V, and 12 V represent the fan performance curve when the supplied voltage is equal to 4 V, 8 V, and 12 V, respectively.

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Fig. 6

Maximum temperature of the heated plate, Tg, and power produced by the TEG, Pgen, as a function of heating power supplied to the heater. The subscripts 1.5, 2.1, and 2.6 represent Nfin equal to 1.5 fins/cm, 2.1 fins/cm, and 2.6 fins/cm, respectively.

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Fig. 7

Cooling fan performance and power consumed by the fan as a function of volume rate of air in the fan for different Hfin. The subscripts 23, 32, and 50 represent Hfin equal to 23 mm, 32 mm, and 50 mm, respectively. The subscripts 4 V, 8 V, and 12 V represent the fan performance curve when the supplied voltage is equal to 4 V, 8 V, and 12 V, respectively.

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Fig. 1

Self-cooling concept

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Fig. 9

Comparison between BM and MMa for the maximum temperature of the heated plate, Tg and power produced by the TEG, Pgen, as a function of heating power supplied to the heater

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Fig. 10

Temperature distribution (a) BM (Max T: 113.4 °C and Min T: 43.1 °C) and (b) MMa (Max T: 80.5 °C and Min T: 46.3 °C) for heating power = 230 W, Nfin = 2.15 fins/cm, Hfin = 23 mm

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Fig. 11

Maximum temperature of the heated plate, Tg and power produced by the TEG, Pgen as a function of heating power supplied to the heater for MMa. The subscripts 1.5, 2.1, and 2.6 represent Nfin equal to 1.5 fins/cm, 2.1 fins/cm, and 2.6 fins/cm, respectively.

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Fig. 12

Temperature distribution for MMa model (a) Nfin = 2.25 (Max T: 98 °C and Min T: 56.4 °C), (b) Nfin = 3.5 (Max T: 71.1 °C and Min T: 34.1 °C), and (c) Nfin = 5.2 (Max T: 53.0 °C and Min T: 20.6 °C) for heating power = 280 W and Hfin = 23 mm

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Fig. 13

Maximum temperature of the heated plate, Tg and power produced by the TEG, Pgen as a function of heating power supplied to the heater for MMa, MMb, and MMc

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Fig. 8

Maximum temperature of the heated plate and power produced by the TEG, Pgen, as a function of heating power supplied to the heater. The subscripts 23, 32, and 40 represent the Hfin equal to 23 mm, 32 mm, and 40 mm, respectively.

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