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Research Papers

Heat Transfer in Rotating Serpentine Coolant Passage With Ribbed Walls at Low Mach Numbers

[+] Author and Article Information
Shang-Feng Yang

Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory,
Mechanical Engineering Department,
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843-3123

Je-Chin Han

Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory,
Mechanical Engineering Department,
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843-3123
e-mail: jc-han@tamu.edu

Salam Azad, Ching-Pang Lee

Siemens Energy, Inc.,
4400 Alafaya Trail,
Orlando, FL 32826

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received March 23, 2014; final manuscript received October 3, 2014; published online November 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Srinath V. Ekkad.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(1), 011013 (Mar 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1056; doi: 10.1115/1.4028905 History: Received March 23, 2014; Revised October 03, 2014; Online November 25, 2014

This paper experimentally investigates the effect of rotation on heat transfer in typical turbine blade serpentine coolant passage with ribbed walls at low Mach numbers. To achieve the low Mach number (around 0.01) condition, pressurized Freon R-134a vapor is utilized as the working fluid. The flow in the first passage is radial outward, after the 180 deg tip turn the flow is radial inward to the second passage, and after the 180 deg hub turn the flow is radial outward to the third passage. The effects of rotation on the heat transfer coefficients were investigated at rotation numbers up to 0.6 and Reynolds numbers from 30,000 to 70,000. Heat transfer coefficients were measured using the thermocouples-copper-plate-heater regional average method. Heat transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and rotation numbers. An increase in heat transfer rates due to rotation is observed in radially outward passes; a reduction in heat transfer rate is observed in the radially inward pass. Regional heat transfer coefficients are correlated with Reynolds numbers for nonrotation and with rotation numbers for rotating condition, respectively. The results can be useful for understanding real rotor blade coolant passage heat transfer under low Mach number, medium–high Reynolds number, and high rotation number conditions.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Common internal cooling technique in advanced gas turbine blades

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Fig. 2

Typical turbine blade internal cooling channel with rotation-induced vortices

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Fig. 3

Schematic of rotating facility

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Fig. 4

(a) Internal view of test section on pressure surface and (b) cross section view of serpentine internal flow channels

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Fig. 5

Schematic of serpentine internal coolant passages with 45 deg angled rib arrangement

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Fig. 6

Refrigerant R134a vapor working loop schematic

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Fig. 7

Re effect: variation of Nu/Nu0 at channel midregions

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Fig. 8

Re effect: variation of Nu/Nu0 at channel tip and hub turn regions

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Fig. 9

Effect on rotation on the variation of internal Nu/Nu0 along the three passage serpentine channel (a) stationary and (b) 300 RPM rotating

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Fig. 10

Ro effect: variation of Nu/Nus at channel midregions

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Fig. 11

Ro effect: variation of Nu/Nus at channel tip and hub turn regions

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