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Research Papers

Cooling Performance Evaluation of Synthetic Jet Based Thermal Solution Module

[+] Author and Article Information
Ahmad Jalilvand

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba,
Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512, Japan
e-mail: Jalilvand@fujikura.co.jp

Masataka Mochizuki

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba,
Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512, Japan
e-mail: mmotizuk@fujikura.co.jp

Yuji Saito

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba,
Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512, Japan
e-mail: Y_saito@fujikura.co.jp

Yoji Kawahara

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba,
Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512, Japan
e-mail: ykawahara@fujikura.co.jp

Randeep Singh

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba,
Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512, Japan
e-mail: Randeep.singh@jp.fujikura.com

Vijit Wuttijumnong

Fujikura Ltd.,
3150 Suite A Coronado Drive,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
e-mail: vijit@fujikura.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received August 23, 2013; final manuscript received January 8, 2014; published online May 6, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Hongbin Ma.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(3), 031010 (Sep 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-13-1143; doi: 10.1115/1.4028342 History: Received August 23, 2013; Revised January 08, 2014; Online May 06, 2015

The convective thermal resistance which represents the heat removal from the heat sink surface of a heat pipe/heat sink module to mean coolant flow temperature is often a dominant contributor to the overall thermal resistance of a heat pipe/heat sink module or remote heat exchange (RHE). RHE is a thermal solution module composed of a heat spreader, thin flattened heat pipe with low profile heat sink which is widely used for the thermal management of compact portable electronic devices. Minimizing the convective thermal resistance at the heat sink of RHE as well as thickness reduction is often an important objective for the thermal designers. Recently, an alternate air mover system which operates based on piezoelectricity is developed. This device is called dual cooling jet (DCJ) in short which can be fabricated with very small thickness down to 1.0 mm. Thin DCJ as a synthetic jet generates air jet with more than 7 m/s air flow velocity which is promising for the increasing demands of thinner next generation portable electronic devices. DCJ is a promising device to dissipate the heat from the heat sink of a RHE. In this work, the performance of RHE is evaluated when heat is dissipated from its heat sink by DCJ. The results are compared with conventional rotary fan. The results show that more than 12 W of heat can be dissipated by DCJ which can easily compete with some commercialized rotary mini blowers while having much smaller thickness. Various configuration of heat sink–DCJ combinations as well as size and shape of both heat sink and DCJ are tested and based on thermal resistance data, cooling effectiveness of DCJ is studied.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Principle operation of dual cooling jet (DCJ) synthetic jet (a) expansion/expulsion and (b) expansion/ingestion

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Fig. 2

Thin DCJ types. (a) Round type DCJ (30 mm × 1.0 mm) and (b) square type DCJ (40 mm × 40 mm × 1.0 mm).

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Fig. 3

Thin mini rotary blowers for heat removal from thin thermal solution module. (a) Model Sepa HY45T-05-803 (45 mm × 45 mm × 6 mm) and (b) model Sunon UB5U3-500 (30 mm × 30 mm × 3 mm).

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Fig. 4

Combination of round type DCJ and heat pipe/heat sink with fins aligned across heat pipe length

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Fig. 5

Combination of round type DCJ and heat pipe/heat sink with fins aligned along heat pipe length

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Fig. 6

Combination of square type DCJ and thin thermal module

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Fig. 7

Test chamber resembles the condition inside the laptop. (a) Overview of the test chamber and (b) test setup showing the combination of thin heat pipe and DCJ inside test chamber.

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Fig. 8

Schematic of thin thermal solution with square type DCJ inside the test chamber

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Fig. 9

Schematic of the DCJ position with respect to duct and P-Q measurement device

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Fig. 10

Performance comparison between round type DCJ and DC brushless fan (model Sepa HY45T-05-803)

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Fig. 11

Performance comparison between round and square types DCJ for cooling thin thermal solution module. (a) Heater temperature rise from the ambient and (b) thermal resistance.

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Fig. 12

Performance comparison between square type DCJ and mini rotary blowers for cooling thin thermal solution module. (a) Heater temperature rise from the ambient and (b) thermal resistance.

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Fig. 13

Applied AC frequency optimization of square type DCJ. (a) Heater temperature rise from the ambient and (b) thermal resistance.

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Fig. 14

Optimized thickness of square type DCJ. (a) Heater temperature rise from the ambient and (b) thermal resistance.

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Fig. 15

Effect of piezo disk size on square type DCJ performance. (a) Heater temperature rise from the ambient and (b) thermal resistance.

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Fig. 16

Effect of DCJ orifice distance from the heat sink of thin thermal solution module. (a) Heater temperature rise from the ambient and (b) thermal resistance.

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Fig. 17

Effect of duct height on DCJ flow generation

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Fig. 18

Position of DCJ orifice with respect to duct entrance and its effect on DCJ flow generation

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