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Research Papers

Air Impingement Cooling by Synthetic Jet

[+] Author and Article Information
Ahmad Jalilvand

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku,
Tokyo, Japan
e-mail: Jalilvand@fujikura.co.jp

Masataka Mochizuki

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku,
Tokyo, Japan
e-mail: mmotizuk@fujikura.co.jp

Randeep Singh

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku,
Tokyo, Japan
e-mail: Randeep.singh@jp.fujikura.com

Yuji Saito

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku,
Tokyo, Japan
e-mail: Y_saito@fujikura.co.jp

Yoji Kawahara

Fujikura Ltd.,
1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku,
Tokyo, Japan
e-mail: ykawahara@fujikura.co.jp

Vijit Wuttijumnong

Fujikura Ltd.,
3150 Suite A Coronado Drive,
Santa Clara, CA 95054
e-mail: vijit@fujikura.com

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received February 18, 2013; final manuscript received November 15, 2013; published online March 17, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Mehmet Arik.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 6(3), 031008 (Mar 17, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: TSEA-13-1057; doi: 10.1115/1.4026219 History: Received February 18, 2013; Revised November 15, 2013

Modern consumer electronic trends point to a demand for thinner and more portable electronic devices. Conventional cooling systems of these portable electronic devices are challenging to miniaturize in thin profile applications that are typically on the order of several millimeters in thickness. In order to overcome some of these challenges, a synthetic jet, which is also considered as micro fluidic device, is developed. This device which operates based on Piezo electricity is called Dual Cooling Jet (DCJ). DCJ disturbs the boundary layer over a hot component and hence increases heat transfer compare to conventional blower. DCJ is typically defined as a device using a partially enclosed cavity with oscillating walls/diaphragms to create alternating suction and ejection of fluid across an interface or orifice. In this work, the results of cooling performance investigation of DCJ are shown and compared with natural convection cooling. Also, several experiments have been done to study the cooling effect of DCJ at different configuration with respect to heat source and the results are compared. At the end, the effects of heat source size is investigated which are helpful to understand how effective DCJ is when used for cooling several size chips. In addition, the results of this work show that DCJ can be combined with low profile heat sink as a promising next generation ultra thin thermal solution module.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

DCJ structure and principal operation

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Fig. 2

Schematic of set up for vertical impingement cooling by disk type DCJ

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Fig. 3

Schematic of set up for horizontal impingement cooling by square type DCJ

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Fig. 4

Schematic of thermal test set up for cooling performance evaluation of DCJ

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Fig. 5

Jet velocity profile in front of round type DCJ

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Fig. 6

Impingement cooling capacity of round type DCJ and the effect of heater size

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Fig. 7

Impingement cooling capacity of round type DCJ (effect of frequency)

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Fig. 8

Impingement cooling of low form factor heater by round type DCJ

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Fig. 9

Impingement cooling capacity of square type DCJ

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Fig. 10

Impingement cooling capacity of square type DCJ

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Fig. 11

Impingement cooling capacity of square type DCJ

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Fig. 12

Impingement cooling capacity of square type DCJ

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Fig. 13

Impingement cooling capacity of square type DCJ (effect of heater size)

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Fig. 14

Cooling performance capability of portable electronic device by DCJ

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