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Research Papers

An Experimental Study on Heat Transfer Surface Area of Wavy-Fin Heat Exchangers

[+] Author and Article Information
Masoud Asadi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Azad Islamic University Science and Research Branch,
Tehran 1477893855, Iran

Gongnan Xie

The Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design
and Integrated Manufacturing Technology,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi'an 710129, China
e-mail: xgn@nwpu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received October 7, 2013; final manuscript received January 30, 2014; published online March 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Zahid Ayub.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 6(3), 031012 (Mar 26, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-13-1166; doi: 10.1115/1.4026816 History: Received October 07, 2013; Revised January 30, 2014

Effects of wavy-fins surface area on thermal-hydraulic performance of a heat exchanger have been observed. First, a new method to calculate the heat transfer area of wavy-fin surfaces is introduced. The results show that the proposed method is accurate enough to be used in the analysis of heat exchanger performance. One of the important aspects of this method is that it is a direct method compared with the experimental method introduced by Kays and London, and thus might be a strong tool in the optimization of heat exchangers based on different objective functions. Effects of some nondimensional parameters, such as amplitude-to-wavelength ratio, fin space ratio, and channel cross-section ratio on the heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop are also investigated.

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Figures

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Fig. 2

Schematic of wavy plate-fin and heat exchanger: (a) geometrical description of a two-dimensional representation of the interfin flow channel and (b) typical plate-fin heat exchanger

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Fig. 1

Temperature and mass fraction distribution for vapor and noncondensable gas

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Fig. 4

Effect of Reynolds number on pressure drop of air–steam mixture and water

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Fig. 5

Comparison of Colburn factor with numerical data [14] and experimental data [15] for a sinusoidal-wavy channel

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Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of test apparatus

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Fig. 6

Comparison of fanning friction factor with numerical data [14] and experimental data [15] for a sinusoidal-wavy channel

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Fig. 7

Fanning friction factor versus Reynolds number for several corrugation aspect ratios (α = 0.803 and ε = 0.637)

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Fig. 8

Colburn factor versus Reynolds number for several corrugation aspect ratios (α = 0.803 and ε = 0.637)

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Fig. 9

Fanning friction factor versus fin spacing ratio (α = 0.803 and γ = 0.375)

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Fig. 10

Colburn factor versus fin spacing ratio (α = 0.803 and γ = 0.375)

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Fig. 11

Fanning friction factor versus cross-section aspect ratio (γ = 0.375 and ε = 0.637)

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Fig. 12

Colburn factor versus cross-section aspect ratio (γ = 0.375 and ε = 0.637)

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