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Research Papers

Experimental and Numerical Characterization of an Electrically Propelled Vehicles Battery Casing Including Battery Module

[+] Author and Article Information
Johan Anderson, Johan Sjöström, Petra Andersson, Francine Amon, Joakim Albrektsson

SP Fire Research,
Brinellgatan 4, Box 857,
Boras 501 15, Sweden

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received January 20, 2014; final manuscript received June 24, 2014; published online August 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Mehmet Arik.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 6(4), 041015 (Aug 26, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: TSEA-14-1014; doi: 10.1115/1.4028178 History: Received January 20, 2014; Revised June 24, 2014

This paper demonstrates the possibility to predict a battery system's performance in a fire resistance test according to the new amendment of United Nations Regulation No. 100 “Uniform Provisions Concerning the Approval of Vehicles with Regard to Specific Requirements for the Electric Power Train” (R100) based on careful measurements of the physical properties of the casing material, as well as modeling of the battery modules and computer simulations. The methodology of the work consists of estimating the heat transfer coefficients by using a gasoline pool fire model in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FireDynamicsSimulator (FDS), followed by finite-element (FE) calculations of the temperatures in the battery

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of Smartbatt casing and packing of modules with the front part to the left in the figure (figure courtesy of Eva-Maria Hirtz at Fraunhofer LBF)

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Fig. 2

The heat transfer coefficients estimated by the FDS simulations for the battery casing in the pool fire model

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Fig. 3

The temperatures as estimated by the Comsol calculations on the middle lower side of the battery casing

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Fig. 4

Battery module/brick configuration prior to sealing the casing prototype. Note battery module, fitted with thermocouples, in center of larger volume shown on right.

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Fig. 5

Thermocouple placement, thermocouple 1–9 is placed against the bottom of the casing while thermocouple 12–15 is placed on the battery module and Thermocouple 17 and 19 is between the module and the casing. Note that thermocouples 16 and 18 are placed in wells within the battery module. Thermocouple 11 is attached to the manual disconnect in the tunnel.

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Fig. 6

Temperature measurements inside the casing prototype during the fire resistance test

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Fig. 7

Close up on some of the temperature measurements inside the casing prototype during the fire resistance test

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Fig. 8

HRR during fire resistance test. The dashed line represent the prescribed HRR used in the FDS simulations.

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Fig. 9

The heat transfer coefficients estimated by the FDS simulations for the battery casing in for the measured HRR

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Fig. 10

The temperatures as estimated by the Comsol (dashed line), Abaqus (solid line) worst case calculations, and the test data (dashed-dotted line) on the middle lower side of the battery module

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Fig. 11

Temperature at different depths of the battery module at the middle of the battery module in the center of rear part after 120 s into the test

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