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Research Papers

Thermal Simulations of Thermocouple Tips in Hot Jets

[+] Author and Article Information
Sassan Etemad

Dept. BF72363 AB3S,
Volvo Group Trucks Technology,
Gothenburg SE-40508, Sweden
e-mail: sassan.etemad@volvo.com

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF THERMAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS. Manuscript received December 27, 2013; final manuscript received April 7, 2014; published online May 9, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Hongbin Ma.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 6(4), 041008 (May 09, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-13-1210; doi: 10.1115/1.4027465 History: Received December 27, 2013; Revised April 07, 2014

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been carried out for the turbulent convective heat transfer, conduction and radiation for metal thermocouple tips, accommodated in hot gas jets to study the measurement accuracy of the thermocouples. The study covers several thermocouple sizes, jet temperatures, and Reynolds numbers. The spherical bead, representing the tip, becomes so hot that it radiates some heat to the colder surrounding surfaces. This phenomenon is responsible for a gap between the jet temperature and the bead temperature. The mentioned temperature difference is significant. It grows both with bead size and gas temperatures but decreases with the Reynolds number.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Description of the geometry and the numerical simulation domain

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Fig. 2

Illustration of the entire domain surface (a) and the (extremely enlarged) spherical bead surface (b) for a complete model

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Fig. 3

Grid regions, their topology and composition

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Fig. 4

Typical results for the entire computational domain and on the solid wall. The plots show (a) and (b) velocity field and magnitude, respectively, for case 2.

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Fig. 5

Typical results for the entire computational domain and on the solid wall. The plots show (a) and (b) temperature and pressure, respectively, in the fluid for case 2.

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Fig. 6

Typical distribution of Y+ (a) and the heat transfer coefficient (b) on the solid wall for case 2

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Fig. 7

Typical velocity field (a) and (b) and velocity magnitude distribution (c) in the near bead region, for case 2

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Fig. 8

Typical distribution of pressure (a), temperature (b), and density (c), for case 2

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Fig. 9

Typical results for the bead. The plots show Y+ (a) and heat transfer coefficient (b) on the bead surface and the bead temperature (c) and (d) for case 2.

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Fig. 10

Bead Nusselt number as a function of jet Reynolds number

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Fig. 11

Bead Nusselt number as a function of bead Reynolds number

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Fig. 12

Difference between jet temperature and bead temperature as a function of jet Reynolds number

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Fig. 13

Difference between jet temperature and bead temperature as a function of bead Reynolds number

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