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Research Papers

Enhanced Cooling of Electronic Components Using Fluid Flow Under High Adverse Pressure Gradient

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Ravishankar

Department of Applied Mechanics,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: ravi.iitm.mech@gmail.com

K. Arul Prakash

Assistant Professor
Department of Applied Mechanics,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: arulk@iitm.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received February 18, 2013; final manuscript received November 7, 2013; published online May 12, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Mehmet Arik.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 7(3), 031011 (Sep 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: TSEA-13-1036; doi: 10.1115/1.4026004 History: Received February 18, 2013; Revised November 07, 2013; Online May 12, 2015

Heat transfer in electronic systems is studied by simulating flow in a two pass channel with the divider representing a circuit board. Bypass holes are introduced on the circuit board to obtain detailed physical insights of the reversed flows in the second pass and thereby improve the cooling effect. The time-dependent governing equations are solved using an in-house code based on Streamline upwind/Petrov-Galerkin finite element method for Reynolds number ranging from 100 to 900. It is observed that stagnant zones are formed in the return path along the upper heated wall due to the formation of primary recirculation region on the divider plate. These stagnant zones are convected downstream by introducing bypass slots thereby enhancing the convective cooling. A parametric study on the location and number of bypass slots reveals that for a particular combination, the flow becomes unsteady thereby the heat transfer is increased. The presence of multiple slot jets also reduces the overall pressure drop required to drive the flow and heat transfer is very high at the point of impingement between the slots.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Computational domain for sharp 180 deg bend (a) without bypass (b) with bypass

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Fig. 2

Comparison of (a) Cf (b) Nu on the impingement wall with literature

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Fig. 3

Streamline patterns for case 0 at (a) Re = 100 (b) Re = 300 (c) Re = 500 (d) Re = 700 (e) Re = 900

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Fig. 4

Reattachment length at different Re for case 0

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Fig. 5

Streamline patterns for case 1A at (a) Re = 100 (b) Re = 300 (c) Re = 500 (d) Re = 700 (e) Re = 900

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Fig. 6

Streamline patterns for case 2A at (a) Re = 100 (b) Re = 300 (c) Re = 500 (d) Re = 700 (e) Re = 900

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Fig. 7

Streamline patterns for case 2B at (a) Re = 100 (b) Re = 300 (c) Re = 500 (d) Re = 700 (e) Re = 900

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Fig. 8

Velocity and temperature history in case 2A for (a) Re = 500 (b) Re = 700

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Fig. 9

Magnified view of vortices in the region between crossflows at Re = 700 for (a) case 2A, t = 232 (b) case 2A, t = 242 (c) case 2A, t = 252 (d) case 2A, t = 262 (e) case 2B steady vortices

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Fig. 10

(a) Net pressure drop for all cases at different Re, (b) coefficient of friction along the outer wall for all cases at Re = 500

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Fig. 11

Temperature contours at Re = 500 for (a) case 0 (b) case 1A (c) case 1B (d) case 2A (e) case 2B

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Fig. 12

Local Nusselt distribution along bottom wall at all Re for (a) case 0 (b) case 1A (c) case 1B (d) case 2A (e) case 2B

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Fig. 13

Local Nusselt distribution along top wall at all Re for (a) case 0 (b) case 1A (c) case 1B (d) case 2A (e) case 2B

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Fig. 14

Time and space-averaged Nusselt number for all Re on (a) bottom wall (b) top wall

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