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Research Papers

Numerical Methods for Simulating the Reduction of Iron Ore in Blast Furnace Shaft

[+] Author and Article Information
Dong Fu

Center for Innovation through
Visualization and Simulation,
Purdue University Calumet,
2200 169th Street,
Hammond, IN 46323
e-mail: dfu@purdue.edu

Chenn Q. Zhou

Center for Innovation through
Visualization and Simulation,
Purdue University Calumet,
2200 169th Street,
Hammond, IN 46323
e-mail: czhou@purduecal.edu

Yan Chen

Center for Innovation through
Visualization and Simulation,
Purdue University Calumet,
2200 169th Street,
Hammond, IN 46323
e-mail: civis.chenyan@gmail.com

Manuscript received July 18, 2013; final manuscript received October 14, 2013; published online January 24, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Ting Wang.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 6(2), 021014 (Jan 24, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: TSEA-13-1118; doi: 10.1115/1.4025946 History: Received July 18, 2013; Revised October 14, 2013

The blast furnace process is a counter-current moving bed chemical reactor to reduce iron oxides to iron, which involves complex transport phenomena and chemical reactions. The iron ore and coke are alternatively charged into the blast furnace, forming a layer by layer structural burden which is slowly descending in the counter-current direction of the ascending gas flow. A new methodology was proposed to efficiently simulate the gas and solid burden flow in the counter-current moving bed in blast furnace shaft. The gas dynamics, burden movement, chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer between the gas phase and solid phase are included. The new methodology has been developed to explicitly consider the effects of the layer thickness thermally and chemically in the CFD model.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Illustration of the layered burden configuration

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Fig. 2

Layer structure of the burden in a blast furnace shaft

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Fig. 7

Burden configurations, (a) flat layer, and (b) angled layer

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Fig. 6

Snapshots of the burden for each steady state case

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Fig. 5

Steady state approximation for the counter-current moving bed with layered burden

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Fig. 4

Transient averaging for the counter-current moving bed with layered burden

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Fig. 11

Transient distributions of variables (from left to right: type of burden (TOB), FeO concentration, coke carbon(C) concentration, CO volume fraction and CO2 volume fraction): (a) time = 0 (initial condition), (b) tcyc, (c) 1.5tcyc, (d) 7.5tcyc, (e) 8.0tcyc, and (f) 8.5tcyc

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Fig. 13

Comparison of CO volume fraction distributions between the transient and steady state case averaging: (a) Transient case averaging; (b) Steady state case averaging

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Fig. 14

Comparison of CO volume fraction difference between the transient and steady state case averaging: (a) absolute difference (b) relative difference

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Fig. 15

Comparison of the FeO concentration between the transient and steady state case averaging

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Fig. 3

Distribution of TOB in one cycle of charging

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Fig. 8

CO distribution along the bed height

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Fig. 9

Ore temperature distribution along the bed height

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Fig. 10

Comparison between the transient case averaging with the steady state cases averaging: (a) CO distribution along the bed height, and (b) Ore temperature distribution along the bed height

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Fig. 12

Steady state distributions of variables (from left to right: type of burden (TOB), FeO concentration, coke carbon(C) concentration, CO volume fraction and CO2 volume fraction): (a) steady state case with ore at top, and (b) steady state case with coke at top

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