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Research Papers

Experimental Characterization of Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Inside a Tubular Evaporator Utilizing Advanced Microgrooved Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Vibhash Jha

Graduate Student e-mail: vibhash@umd.edu

Serguei Dessiatoun

Research Associate e-mail: ser@umd.edu

Michael Ohadi

Professor e-mail: ohadi@umd.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering,
A. James Clark School of Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20740

Ebrahim Al Hajri

Assistant Professor The Petroleum Institute,
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
e-mail: ealhajri@pi.ac.ae

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 5, 2012; final manuscript received April 5, 2012; published online October 17, 2012. Editor: Michael Jensen.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 4(4), 041009 (Oct 17, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007079 History: Received April 05, 2012; Revised April 05, 2012

Performance enhancement of heat exchangers with a focus in optimum weight/volume and the amount of working fluid in circulation is of significance to a diverse range of industries. This paper presents heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a compact tubular evaporator which utilizes a manifold force-fed microchannel design. A microgrooved structure with an aspect ratio of 3:1 (channel width of 100 μm and channel height of 300 μm) forms the channels used on the refrigerant side and minichannels of 1 mm depth were used on the water side. The system was tested using R134a as the refrigerant with a refrigerant flow rate of 6 to 22 g/s and water flow rate of 150 to 640 ml/s. Overall heat transfer coefficients of more than 10,000 W/m2 K were obtained with modest values of pressure drop. The present results indicate a significant enhancement in thermal performance when compared to the state-of-the-art technologies in the same application area.

Copyright © 2012 by ASME
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References

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Kakaç, S., 1991, Boilers, Evaporators, and Condensers, Wiley-Interscience, New York.
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Anurjew, E., Hansjosten, E., Maikowske, S., Schygulla, U., and Brandner, J. J., 2011, “Microstructure Devices for Water Evaporation,” Appl. Thermal Eng., 31(5), pp. 602–609. [CrossRef]
Cetegen, E., 2010, “Force Fed Microchannel High Heat Flux Cooling Utilizing Microgrooved Surfaces,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park, MD.
Baummer, T., Cetegen, E., Ohadi, M., and Dessiatoun, S., 2008, “Force-Fed Evaporation and Condensation Utilizing Advanced Micro-Structured Surfaces and Micro-Channels,” Microelectron. J., 39(7), pp. 975–980. [CrossRef]
Jha, V., Dessiatoun, S., and Ohadi, M., 2012, “Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Characterization of a Tubular Evaporator Using Manifold on the Microgrooved Surfaces,” ITHERM 2012, IEEE, San Diego, CA, pp. 732–739. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 1

Force-fed evaporation process [10]

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Fig. 2

Fabricated evaporator component

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Fig. 3

Schematic of experimental setup [11]

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Fig. 4

Thermal resistance network [11]

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Fig. 5

Cooling capacity variation with refrigerant flow rate for constant water mass rate of 640 ml/s

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Fig. 6

Cooling capacity variation with water flow rate for constant refrigerant mass rate of 15.3 g/s

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Fig. 7

Water-side pressure drop variation with water-side flow rate

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Fig. 8

Refrigerant-side pressure drop variation with refrigerant flow rate

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Fig. 9

Overall heat transfer coefficient variation with water mass flow rate for constant refrigerant mass rate of 15.3 g/s

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Fig. 10

Overall heat transfer coefficient variation with refrigerant flow rate for constant water mass rate of 640 ml/s

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Fig. 11

Thermal model of triangular channel

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Fig. 12

Base heat transfer coefficient variation with number of nodes for different water mass rate

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Fig. 13

Pressure drop variation with number of nodes for different water mass rate

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Fig. 14

Heat transfer coefficient variation with Reynolds number inside the triangular channel

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Fig. 15

Heat transfer coefficient variation with refrigerant flow rate for constant water mass rate of 640 ml/s

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