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Design Innovation

Heat Transfer Enhancement in Ventilated Brake Disk Using Double Airfoil Vanes

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Nejat1

School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering,  University of Tehran, Tehran, Irannejat@ut.ac.ir

M. Aslani

School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering,  University of Tehran, Tehran, Iranm.aslani@ut.ac.ir

E. Mirzakhalili

School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering,  University of Tehran, Tehran, Irane.mirzakhalili@ut.ac.ir

R. Najian Asl

School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering,  University of Tehran, Tehran, Iranr.najian@ut.ac.ir

1

Corresponding author.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 3(4), 045001 (Nov 07, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004931 History: Received May 04, 2011; Revised August 15, 2011; Published November 07, 2011; Online November 07, 2011

The aim of this research is to enhance the heat transfer of ventilated brake disks using modified vanes. The investigated braking scenario is a hold braking deceleration during a downhill drive. A simple model for computing the steady state vane’s temperature is presented. The heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the brake disk’s ventilation is estimated by means of a verified CFD computation. A novel design for the vanes is proposed using an airfoil profile to improve the air pumping efficiency increasing the flow velocity between vanes. For further improving the ventilating capacity, a secondary airfoil vane is introduced to the primary airfoil vane design. The computed results estimate 17% to 29% improvement in HTC number for new vane design at different disk’s angular velocities.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Brake disks, (a) one layer solid disk and (b) types of ventilated brake disks

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Figure 2

Geometry and boundaries of the problem

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Figure 3

Temperature field of an isolated brake disk

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Figure 4

Triangle meshing for a straight vane disk

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Figure 5

The meshes used in the grid convergence study

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Figure 6

Investigation of the grid convergence

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Figure 7

Comparison of the results of straight vanes disk

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Figure 8

Ventilation by NACA-0009 (Case1)

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Figure 9

Contours of velocity magnitude (m/s), (a) Straight vanes and (b) Case1

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Figure 10

New design by adding secondary NACA-0009 (Case2)

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Figure 11

Contours of velocity magnitude (m/s), (a) Case1 and (b) Case2

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Figure 12

Contours of temperature distribution (K), (a) straight vanes, (b) Case1, and (c) Case2

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Figure 13

Vectors of relative x, y velocity magnitudes (m/s), (a) straight vanes, (b) Case1, and (c) Case2

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Figure 14

The zone of the nodes (dashed lines), (a) straight vanes, (b) Case1, and (c) Case2

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Figure 15

Comparison of the velocity for selected nodes on the imaginary line

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