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Technical Briefs

Heat Conduction Effect on Oscillating Heat Pipe Operation

[+] Author and Article Information
C. D. Smoot, C. A. Wilson

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211

H. B. Ma1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211mah@missouri.edu

L. Greenberg

 Northrop Grumman Corporation, Linthicum, MD 21090

1

Corresponding author.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 3(2), 024501 (Jul 05, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004077 History: Received December 09, 2010; Revised April 07, 2011; Published July 05, 2011; Online July 05, 2011

The effect of heat conduction through the adiabatic section on the oscillating motion and heat transfer performance in an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) was investigated experimentally. Two, closed loop, six-turn OHPs were constructed: one with a separate copper block for the evaporator and condenser sections (split block design) and one using a single continuous copper block for the evaporator, adiabatic, and condenser sections (continuous block design). The results show that the presence of heat conduction directly from the evaporator wall to the adiabatic section and from the adiabatic section to the condenser of a heat pipe will reduce the oscillating amplitude of the evaporator, adiabatic, and condenser temperatures. It was also found that in addition to a higher level of temperature uniformity, the continuous block design results in better heat transfer performance than a heat pipe without conduction through the adiabatic section.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Split-block design of OHP and thermocouple number and locations schematic (units are in mm)

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Figure 2

Continuous design of OHP and thermocouple number and locations schematic (units are in mm)

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Figure 3

Power input effect on the steady state temperatures of acetone charged heat pipes in the vertical orientation with 40°C cooling bath and (a) continuous block at 150 W, (b) split block at 150 W, (c) continuous block at 250 W, and (d) split block at 250 W (TC: thermocouple)

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Figure 4

Working fluid effect on the steady state temperatures of both heat pipes in the vertical orientation with 60°C cooling bath, 200 W input power, and (a) continuous block charged with acetone, (b) split block charged with acetone, (c) continuous block charged with water, and (d) split block charged with water (TC: thermocouple)

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Figure 5

Orientation effect on the steady state temperatures of water charged heat pipes at 300 W, with 40°C cooling bath temperature and (a) continuous block in the vertical (bottom heating) orientation, (b) split block in the vertical (bottom heating) orientation, (c) continuous block in the horizontal (side heating) orientation, and (d) split block in the horizontal (side heating) orientation (TC: thermocouple)

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Figure 6

Operating temperature effect on the average evaporator to condenser temperature difference for water charged OHPs in bottom heating vertical orientation

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Figure 7

Operating temperature effect on the average evaporator to condenser temperature difference for water charged OHPs in the side heating horizontal orientation

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Figure 8

Operating temperature effect on the average evaporator to condenser temperature difference for acetone charged OHPs in bottom heating vertical orientation

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Figure 9

Operating temperature effect on the average evaporator to condenser temperature difference for acetone charged OHPs in the side heating horizontal orientation

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