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Research Papers

The Development of Performance Prediction Methods for an Automotive CO2 A/C Cycle

[+] Author and Article Information
Akira Kaneko

Department of Environment and Energy Engineering,  Waseda University, Honjoh, Saitama 367-0035, Japanakira-kaneko@y.toki.waseda.jp

Masafumi Katsuta

Graduate School of Environment and Energy Engineering,  Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, JapanKatsuta@waseda.jp

Takahiro Oshiro

Graduate School of Environment and Energy Engineering,  Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japanyuki-no-teto@moegi.waseda.jp

Sangchul Bae

Graduate School of Environment and Energy Engineering,  Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japanscbae@mn.waseda.ac.jp

Shunji Komatsu

Graduate School of Environment and Energy Engineering,  Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japans.komatsu@kurenai.waseda.jp

Yohei Ohno

Department of Environment and Energy Engineering,  Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japanyouhei214–ok@toki.waseda.jp

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 3(2), 021004 (Jul 13, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003887 History: Received December 27, 2010; Revised March 02, 2011; Published July 13, 2011; Online July 13, 2011

In previous research, we have been focusing on the performance of the each element heat transfer and hydraulic performance of refrigeration cycle. Experimental investigations have been repeated several times, and finally, we have substantial database including the effect of lubricant oil. Moreover, the maldistribution of two-phase in an evaporator can be also predicted from the experimental database. Under these circumstances, this study is intended to effectively put the construction of an automotive CO2 air conditioning system into practical design use through the simulation using the above-mentioned database. This paper describes the refrigeration cycle performance prediction of each element (e.g., an evaporator, a gas-cooler, and so on) by a simulation using substantial database and various available correlations proposed by us and several other researchers. In the performance prediction model of heat exchangers, local heat transfer and flow characteristics are considered and, in addition, the effects of lubricant oil on heat transfer and pressure drop are duly considered. The comparison is also made between simulation results and bench test results using a real automotive air conditioning system. Finally, the developed simulation method can predict the cooling capacity successfully within ±10% for A/C system simulation. By incorporating the lubricant oil effect, the simulation results are improved to ±5% and ±15% for the cooling capacity and pressure drop for evaporator simulation, respectively.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Flowchart of cycle simulation

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Figure 8

Prediction accuracy of measured and calculated values (B-type)

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Figure 9

Comparison of measured and calculated results (cycle simulation)

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Figure 1

Flowchart of evaporator simulation

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Figure 3

Structure of evaporator

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Figure 4

Schematic of evaporator

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Figure 5

Modified baker flow pattern map with Koyama’s exp. condition

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Figure 6

Prediction accuracy of measured and calculated values

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Figure 7

Prediction accuracy of measured and calculated values (S-type)

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