0
Research Papers

Analysis of the Flow in the Combustor—Transition Piece Considering the Variation in the Fuel Composition

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Arturo Alfaro-Ayala

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Guanajuato, Salamanca, Gto., 36885, Méxicoja.alfaroayala@ugto.mx Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (IIE), Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62490, Méxicoja.alfaroayala@ugto.mx

A. Gallegos-Muñoz

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Guanajuato, Salamanca, Gto., 36885, Méxicogallegos@salamanca.ugto.mx Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (IIE), Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62490, Méxicogallegos@salamanca.ugto.mx

J. Manuel Riesco-Ávila, M. Flores-López, A. Campos-Amezcua, A. Germán Mani-González

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Guanajuato, Salamanca, Gto., 36885, México Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (IIE), Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62490, México

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 3(2), 021003 (Jul 13, 2011) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004247 History: Received September 10, 2010; Revised May 13, 2011; Published July 13, 2011; Online July 13, 2011

An analysis of the flow that depends on the fuel composition (natural gas) in the combustor–transition piece system, applying computational fluid dynamics, is presented. The study defines the velocity and temperature profiles at the exit of the transition piece and the hot streak along the system. The variation of the composition in the fuel depends of the amount of N2 contained in the fuel, and the hot track influences on the temperature distribution at the input of the first stage of vanes and blades of the gas turbine. The study takes place in a three-dimensional model in steady state using FLUENT® 6.3.26, applying the k-ε turbulence model and chemical equilibrium to the combustion process. The results show the influence of the transition piece geometry over the velocity and temperature profiles, principally, in the radial direction. The velocity profiles on the radial direction can be represented by six order polynomial and the temperature profile by third order polynomial. The temperature and velocity profiles keep a symmetry profile and they can be represented by six order polynomial at the circumferential direction. Knowing these profiles, it is possible to compute a more exact study of the heat transfer at vanes and blades of the first stage of the turbine to evaluate the performance and life of them. On the other hand, considering from 2% to 10% of N2 in the fuel composition, the maximum temperature is reduced in the combustion process and consequently the NOx emissions too.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

A general view of the arrangement of combustor basket, clamshell, and transition piece

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Arrangement of 14 transition pieces, (a) they form a ring-type configuration and (b) installed transition pieces in a 501F gas turbine [17]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Transition piece dimensions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Generation of geometry, (a) side view and (b) outlet of the transition piece

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Structured mesh for the combustor–transition piece (a) inlet circular section and (b) outlet of the transition piece

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Air flow distribution in the combustor–transition piece

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Radial profiles: (a) velocity and (b) temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Circumferential profiles: (a) velocity and (b) temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Velocity magnitude

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Static temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Temperature distribution using (a) laminar flamelet model and (b) chemical equilibrium model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Contours of static temperature along the transition piece (hot streak)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Evidence of failure due to high temperatures and lack of cooling at the end of the transition piece

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Nitrogen oxides NOx

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

NOx formation considering the amount of N2 contained in the fuel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Maximum temperature considering the amount of N2 contained in the fuel

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In