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Research Papers

A New Approach to Study and Compare the Annual Performance of Liquid and Solid Desiccant Cooling Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Fatemeh Esfandiari Nia

Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106F.Nia@asu.edu

Patrick E. Phelan

Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-6106phelan@asu.edu

Dolf van Paassen

Professor (Chair of Energy in Built Environment) Process and Energy Technology,  Delft University of Technology, 2628 CA Delft, The Netherlands

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 3(2), 021002 (Jul 13, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003826 History: Received August 06, 2010; Revised March 03, 2011; Published July 13, 2011; Online July 13, 2011

Desiccant cooling systems, considered one of the sustainable air conditioning technologies, have been attractive for researchers to be studied for many years. In this paper, the modeling and simulation of a packed tower liquid dehumidifier and regenerator as well as a solid desiccant wheel are presented. The simplified equations that predict the air conditions after passing these systems are developed. This approach is quick and does not need a lengthy computer calculation and large memory capacity. Liquid and solid desiccant cooling cycles are presented and using this approach, the performance of these systems is calculated for weather data of a reference year and different climates in the United States. These systems are compared regarding their energy and water consumption based on this new approach. The first results show that liquid desiccant systems, without technology improvements, are relatively large but with low capacities and have lower coefficients of performance than solid desiccant cooling systems.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The schematic diagram of a simple solid desiccant cooling system considered for annual simulation and different climates in the USA

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Figure 2

Outlet air humidity calculated by the complete numerical model [8] and compared with the results given by the correlations (Eqs. 1,2,3,4). The wheel width is 20 cm, the thickness of the desiccant layer is 0.2 mm, and the pitch of the honeycomb-shaped matrix is 3.2 × 1.8 mm, all based on the information given by the manufacturers.

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Figure 3

Outlet air temperature calculated by the complete numerical simulation [8] and compared with the results given by the correlations (Eqs. 1,2,3,4)

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Figure 4

The schematic representation of the packed-bed desiccant dehumidifier and regenerator

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Figure 5

The distribution of errors for outlet air conditions after an adiabatic packed-bed liquid desiccant dehumidifier tower

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Figure 6

The distribution of errors for outlet air conditions after an adiabatic packed-bed liquid desiccant regenerator tower

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Figure 7

A schematic representation of an adiabatic liquid desiccant cooling system considered for annual simulation

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Figure 8

The supply temperatures provided by solid and liquid desiccant systems for a 1-ton cooling capacity for Miami

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Figure 9

A comparison of the hourly COP for the solid and liquid desiccant cooling systems for Miami

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Figure 10

The distribution and frequency of the annual COP of liquid and solid desiccant cooling systems for Miami

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Figure 11

A comparison of energy consumption for different desiccant cooling systems and climates

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Figure 12

A comparison of water consumption for different desiccant cooling systems and climates

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