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Research Papers

Thermal Field Measurements of a Thermoacoustically Driven Thermoacoustic Refrigerator

[+] Author and Article Information
Syeda Humaira Tasnim1

Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canadashtasnim@engmail.uwaterloo.ca

Roydon Andrew Fraser

Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada

1

Corresponding author.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 2(2), 021010 (Nov 08, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002753 History: Received May 10, 2010; Revised September 28, 2010; Published November 08, 2010; Online November 08, 2010

Thermoacoustic refrigerator is a device that transfers heat from a low temperature medium to a high-temperature medium by using sound energy as work input. We have designed and tested a simplified thermally driven thermoacoustic refrigerator. Our refrigerator is easy to make, uses no moving parts, and has proved to be an impressive illustration of simplicity, an inherent attribute of thermoacoustic engines. At the same time it can be used as a working demonstration of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Also, in this paper we have reported the results of measurements of temperature gradients and maximum cooling temperature in a thermally driven thermoacoustic refrigerator. The present research shows that the magnitude and position of the maximum cooling temperature depend on the position of the prime mover stack from the nearest pressure antinode. Based on the design of this simplified thermally driven thermoacoustic refrigerator, the design of a complete thermally driven thermoacoustic refrigerator is in progress.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) A standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator, (b) an ordinary loudspeaker used to drive the standing-wave refrigerator (1), and (c) cut out of a loudspeaker

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Figure 2

(a) A thermoacoustically driven thermoacoustic refrigerator. (b) A schematic diagram of a thermoacoustically driven thermoacoustic refrigerator. (c) Cross section of Celcor ceramic stack.

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Figure 3

(a) Schematic diagram of a thermoacoustically driven thermoacoustic refrigerator. (b) Temperature distribution along the stacks. (c) Energy flow diagram in a TADTAR. (d) Frequency spectrum of the emitted sound. Disregard the vertical scale. Prime mover stacks are (d) 5 cm and (e) 7.5 cm from the nearest pressure antinode. (f) Plot of pressure magnitude and phase versus frequency.

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Figure 4

(a) Temperature versus time when the refrigerator stack is 4 cm away from the pressure antinode. (b) Temperature versus time when the refrigerator stack is 3 cm away from the pressure antinode. (c) Temperature versus time when the refrigerator stack is 2 cm away from the pressure antinode.(d) Measured temperature difference as a function of kx when the prime mover stack is located 7.5 cm from the nearest pressure antinode.

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Figure 5

(a) Comparison of the time evolution of temperature distributions for different positions of the prime mover stack when the refrigerator stack is 1 cm away from the nearest pressure antinode. (b) Comparison of the time evolution of temperature distributions for different positions of the prime mover stack when the refrigerator stack is 2 cm away from the nearest pressure antinode. (c) Comparison of the time evolution of temperature distributions for different positions of the prime mover stack when the refrigerator stack is 3 cm away from the nearest pressure antinode. (d) Comparison of the time evolution of temperature distributions for different positions of the prime mover stack when the refrigerator stack is 4 cm away from the nearest pressure antinode. (e) Temperature difference as a function of distance of the refrigerator stack from the nearest pressure antinode for two different prime mover stack positions.

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Figure 6

Temperature versus time when the refrigerator stack is 4 cm away from the pressure antinode

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Figure 7

(a) Enthalpy flow through the stack versus temperature difference across the stack. (b) The cooling power and acoustic power as a function of the refrigerator stack location from the nearest pressure antinode. (c) The COP as a function of the normalized refrigerator stack location from the nearest pressure antinode. (d) The COPR as a function of the normalized refrigerator stack location from the nearest pressure antinode.

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Figure 8

(a) COP versus enthalpy flow along the stack for both positions of the prime mover stack. (b) COPR versus enthalpy flow along the stack for both positions of the prime mover stack.

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