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Predicting the Thermal Conductivity of Foam Neoprene at Elevated Ambient Pressure

[+] Author and Article Information
Erik Bardy

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Grove City College, 100 Campus Drive, Grove City, PA 16127-2104

Joseph Mollendorf

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, 318 Jarvis Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260-4400

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 2(1), 014501 (Jul 14, 2010) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001937 History: Received April 23, 2010; Revised June 02, 2010; Published July 14, 2010; Online July 14, 2010

The purpose of this paper is to present a correlation for predicting the thermal conductivity of foam neoprene at varying ambient pressure. In a previous study, the authors used well-known upper and lower bounds to develop the form of a semi-empirical correlation for the thermal conductivity of foam neoprene as a function of increasing ambient pressure. The correlation was in terms of three constants, which were determined by performing a nonlinear regression on experimentally measured thermal conductivity values of foam neoprene insulation at varying ambient pressure. In this present paper, we show that the three correlation constants can, alternately, be determined by using values of the constituent thermal conductivities (e.g., air and rubber) and the effective thermal conductivity at one pressure point only (reference pressure). Values predicted using the correlation were compared with previously measured values of the effective thermal conductivity of foam neoprene insulation under increased ambient pressure, up to 1.18 MPa. It was found that there was a maximum difference of approximately 14% between the predicted and measured values. It was also found that the accuracy of the correlation did not depend strongly on the reference pressure used. It was therefore concluded that the effective thermal conductivity of foam neoprene, as a function of increasing ambient pressure, can be predicted if the constituent thermal conductivities are known (air and rubber), as well as the effective thermal conductivity at one reference pressure.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Experimentally measured k∗ values of 5 mm thick foam neoprene from Bardy (1) compared with predictions of k∗ from Eq. 8(M∗Pa, W∗∗/m K, u∗∗∗nitless)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Experimentally measured k∗ values of 12 mm thick foam neoprene from Bardy, (1) compared with predictions of k∗ from Eq. 8(M∗Pa, W∗∗/m K, u∗∗∗nitless)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Experimentally measured k∗ values of 8 mm thick foam neoprene from Monji, (9) compared with predictions of k∗ from Eq. 8(M∗Pa, W∗∗/m K, u∗∗∗nitless)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Experimentally measured k∗ values of the first 5 mm thick foam neoprene from Monji (9) compared with predictions of k∗ from Eq. 8(M∗Pa, W∗∗/m K, u∗∗∗nitless)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Experimentally measured k∗ values of the second 5 mm thick foam neoprene from Monji (9) compared with predictions of k∗ from Eq. 8(M∗Pa, W∗∗/m K, u∗∗∗nitless)

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