0
Research Papers

Numerical Simulation of Thermal Stress for a Liquid-Cooled Exhaust Manifold

[+] Author and Article Information
Dong Fu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Calumet, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323dfu@purdue.edu

Dui Huang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Calumet, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323huangdui@gmail.com

Ahmed Juma

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Calumet, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323ahmedyounes@yahoo.com

Curtis M. Schreiber

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Calumet, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323schreiberc@msn.com

Xiuling Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Calumet, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323wangx@calumet.purdue.edu

Chenn Q. Zhou

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University Calumet, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323qzhou@calumet.purdue.edu

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 1(3), 031010 (Apr 23, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001258 History: Received January 25, 2009; Revised November 05, 2009; Published April 23, 2010; Online April 23, 2010

Liquid-cooled exhaust manifolds are widely used in turbocharged diesel engines. The large temperature gradient in the overall manifold can cause remarkable thermal stress. The objective of the project is to optimize the operation condition and modify the current design in order to prevent high thermal stress and to extend the lifespan of the manifold. To achieve the objective, the combination between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with finite element (FE) is introduced. First, CFD analysis is conducted to obtain temperature distribution, providing conditions of the thermomechanical loading on the FE mesh. Next, FE analysis is carried out to determine the thermal stress. The interpolation of the temperature data from CFD to FE is done by binary space partitioning tree algorithm. To accurately quantify the thermal stress, nonlinear material behavior is considered. Based on stresses and strains, the fatigue life can be estimated. The CFD results are compared with that of the number of transfer units’ method and are further verified with industrial experiment data. All these comparisons indicate that the present investigation reasonably predicts the thermal stress behavior. Based on the results, recommendations are given to optimize the manifold design and operation.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

y+ contour of the exhaust gas boundary layer

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Temperature contour of the manifold cross-section (unsteady case)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Inner wall temperature of exhaust pipe during engine start-up

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Inner wall temperature contour of exhaust pipe during engine start-up

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Thermal stress contour during engine start-up

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Inner wall temperature of the exhaust pipe during engine running

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Inner wall temperature contour (K) of exhaust pipe during engine running

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Thermal stress contour comparison (unsteady case versus steady case)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Exhaust pipe inner wall temperature during engine shutdown

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Thermal stress contour during engine shutdown

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Linear elastic thermal stress contour (steady case)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Mapped temperature contour (steady case)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 21

Nonlinear material behavior of mild steel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 22

Linear elastic thermal strain contour (steady case)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 23

Linear elastic/nonlinear elastic-plastic thermal stresses and strains (steady case)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 24

Strain life contour comparison

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 25

Effects of coolant mass flow rate on strain life contour

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 26

Effects of coolant mass flow rate on strain life

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 27

Three different exhaust pipe thickness designs for the manifold

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 28

Exhaust pipe thickness effects on strain life

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Geometry of the manifold

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Thermal boundary conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

FE mesh and boundary conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Model simplification

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Engine bench test

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Average temperature of the exhaust pipe during run cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Temperature contour of the manifold cross-section (steady case)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In