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INVITED PAPERS

On the Design of an Aero-Engine Nose Cone Anti-Icing System Using a Rotating Heat Pipe

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Gilchrist, D. Ewing

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S4L7, Canada

C. Y. Ching1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S4L7, Canadachingcy@mcmaster.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 1(2), 022002 (Oct 13, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000191 History: Received February 27, 2009; Revised September 01, 2009; Published October 13, 2009

The feasibility of using a rotating heat pipe to anti-ice the nose cones of small turbofan aero-engines is investigated. A stationary jacket evaporator design was used to transport heat into the rotating heat pipe located along the central fan shaft of the engine. The rotating heat pipe condenser was made an integral part of the nose cone using a high conductivity, lightweight material and the tip of the nose cone. The use of heating channels along the nose cone and passive heat transfer enhancement in the evaporator were also investigated. The computational model used to predict the heat transfer performance is outlined. The overall heat transfer to the nose cone was 0.8–1.2 kW using water in the heat pipe and 0.4–0.75kW using ethanol. The heating channels were not effective due to the small contact area with the nose cone. The heat transfer enhancement in the evaporator increased the total heat transfer modestly and the temperature of the nose cone increased over the contact area made with the high conductivity material. The results show that rotating heat pipes are a feasible nose cone anti-icing technology.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of proposed rotating heat pipe anti-icing system

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Figure 2

Schematic showing coordinate system for modeling of rotating heat pipe

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Figure 3

Heat transfer rate through the anti-icing system using — water and - - - ethanol as the working fluid in the heat pipe at airplane speeds of V=◇300 km/h and △ 600 km/h

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Figure 4

Effect of atmospheric air temperature on the surface temperature of the nose cone using water at Tamb=◇-5°C, △-10°C, ×-20°C, and ○-30°C for ω=5000 rpm and V=300 km/h

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Figure 5

Effect of working fluid on surface temperature of the nose cone using — water and - - - ethanol at ω=○ 5000 rpm, × 10,000 rpm, △ 15,000 rpm, and ◇ 20,000 rpm for V=300 km/h and Tamb=−30°C

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Figure 6

Effect of airplane speed on the surface temperature of the nose cone using water at V=300 km/h: ● 5000 rpm, ◆ 20,000 rpm and V=600 km/h: ○ 5000 rpm, ◇ 20000 rpm for Tamb=−30°C

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Figure 7

Effect of heating channels on the surface temperature of the nose cone using water with ◆ 10 insulated channels, ◇ 10, △ 50, and ○ 100 active channels for ω=5000 rpm and Tamb=−30°C

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Figure 8

Thermal resistance representation of the anti-icing system

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