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Technical Briefs

A Quantitative Method for Assessment of Car Inclination Effects on Thermal Management of the Underhood Compartment

[+] Author and Article Information
Mahmoud Khaled

Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, CNRS-UMR 6607, Ecole Polytechnique de l’université de Nantes, rue Christian Pauc, BP 50609, 44 306 Nantes Cedex 3, France; PSA Peugeot Citroën, 2 route de Gisy, 78 943 Vélizy Villacoublay, France

Fabien Harambat

 PSA Peugeot Citroën, 2 route de Gisy, 78 943 Vélizy Villacoublay, France

Hassan Peerhossaini

Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, CNRS-UMR 6607, Ecole Polytechnique de l’université de Nantes, rue Christian Pauc, BP 50609, 44 306 Nantes Cedex 3, Francehassan.peerhossaini@univ-nantes.fr

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 1(1), 014501 (Jul 21, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3159477 History: Received November 07, 2008; Revised March 29, 2009; Published July 21, 2009

The study presented here concerns the impact of car inclination on the temperatures in the vehicle underhood compartment. We report here underhood thermal measurements carried out on a vehicle in wind tunnel S4 of Saint-Cyr, France. The underhood is instrumented by 80 surface and air thermocouples. Measurements are carried out for three different thermal charges (thermal functioning points). During tests, the engine is in operation, and the front wheels positioned on the test facility equipped with rollers, permitting the wheel power and rotational speed control. Three car inclinations are tested.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Test facility rollers permitting the wheel power and rotational speed control

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Figure 2

Inclination configurations tested

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Figure 3

Temperature evolutions at the cold box in TFP-3 for two times repeated test

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Figure 4

Typical exponential tendencies of temperatures in constant-speed driving for TFP-3 for six cases tested

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Figure 5

Temperature tendencies in thermal-soak phase for TFP-1 for six cases tested

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Figure 6

Effects of car inclination on temperature at the cylinder-head cover in thermal-soak for TFP-2

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Figure 7

Maximum relative temperature differences for tested components, in up-hill and down-hill car inclinations in constant-speed driving

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Figure 8

Schematic of the thermal situation in both the up-hill and the down-hill inclination configurations in (a) constant-speed driving phase and (b) thermal-soak phase

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