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Research Papers

Aerothermal Challenges in Syngas, Hydrogen-Fired, and Oxyfuel Turbines—Part II: Effects of Internal Heat Transfer

[+] Author and Article Information
Minking K. Chyu

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261; National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236

Sean C. Siw, Ventzislav G. Karaivanov, William S. Slaughter

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261

Mary Anne Alvin

 National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15236

J. Thermal Sci. Eng. Appl 1(1), 011003 (Jul 21, 2009) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3159480 History: Received December 15, 2008; Revised March 24, 2009; Published July 21, 2009

Future advanced turbine systems for electric power generation, based on coal-gasified fuels with CO2 capture and sequestration, are aimed for achieving higher cycle efficiency and near-zero emission. The most promising operating cycles being developed are hydrogen-fired cycle and oxyfuel cycle. Both cycles will likely have turbine working fluids significantly different from that of conventional air-based gas turbines. In addition, the oxyfuel cycle will have a turbine inlet temperature target at approximately 2030 K (1760°C), significantly higher than the current level. This suggests that aerothermal control and cooling will play a critical role in realizing our nation’s future fossil power generation systems. This paper provides a computational analysis in comparing the internal cooling performance of a double-wall or skin-cooled airfoil to that of an equivalent serpentine-cooled airfoil. The present results reveal that the double-wall or skin-cooled approach produces superior performance than the conventional serpentine designs. This is particularly effective for the oxyfuel turbine with elevated turbine inlet temperatures. The effects of coolant-side internal heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil metal temperature in both hydrogen-fired and oxyfuel turbines are evaluated. The contribution of thermal barrier coatings toward overall thermal protection for turbine airfoil cooled under these two different cooling configurations is also assessed.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Serpentine cooling and double-wall cooling

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Figure 3

Schematic of multilayer thermal and oxidation protection system

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Figure 4

Surface heat transfer coefficient around midspan

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Figure 5

Midspan airfoil outer profile and plot direction

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Figure 6

Airfoil metal temperature distribution (in Kelvin) hc=3000 W/m2 K for (a) hydrogen-fired turbine and (b) oxyfuel turbine

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Figure 7

Surface temperature distributions along airfoil midspan with serpentine cooling (a) hc=1000 W/m2 K and (b) hc=3000 W/m2 K

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Figure 8

Surface temperature distributions along airfoil midspan in hydrogen-fired turbine (a) hc=1000 W/m2 K and (b) hc=3000 W/m2 K

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Figure 9

Surface temperature distributions along airfoil midspan in oxyfuel turbine (a) hc=1000 W/m2 K and (b) hc=3000 W/m2 K

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Figure 10

Internal heat transfer coefficient varying in different cooling passages (a) serpentine-cooled airfoil and (b) skin-cooled airfoil

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Figure 11

Airfoil surface temperature distribution with varying passage heat transfer coefficient and serpentine cooling configuration (a) hydrogen-fired turbine and (b) oxyfuel turbine

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Figure 12

Airfoil surface temperature distribution with varying passage heat transfer coefficient and skin cooling configuration (a) hydrogen-fired turbine and (b) oxyfuel turbine

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Figure 13

Edge areas (circled) with additional TBC thickness

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Figure 14

Temperature contours (in Kelvin) of skin-cooled oxyfuel airfoil with different TBC thickness applied over leading edge and trailing edge

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Figure 15

Midspan airfoil surface temperature with serpentine cooling and TBC thickness of 250 μm and 350 μm (a) hydrogen-fired turbine and (b) oxyfuel turbine

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Figure 16

Midspan airfoil surface temperature with skin cooling and TBC thickness of 250 μm and 350 μm (a) hydrogen-fired turbine and (b) oxyfuel turbine

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Figure 17

Midspan airfoil surface temperature in oxyfuel turbine with TBC thickness 250 μm and 550 μm (a) serpentine-cooled airfoil and (b) skin-cooled airfoil

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Figure 1

Airfoil profile and cascade geometry

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